aquaculture

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aquaculture

the manipulation of the reproduction, growth rates and mortality of aquatic organisms useful to mankind, to enhance their yield; the aquatic equivalent of AGRICULTURE.
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Aquaculturists had experienced annually increasing mortality in their submarket-sized hard clams over the 3 y since initiating hard clam culture in the Provincetown Harbor.
Aquaculturists ensure that you can still eat healthy fish without harming the environment, explains Becca.
Farmers are converting their barns into re-circulating aquaculture systems, and Ohio State University (OSU) aquaculturists are educating farmers on how to make the switch.
PFO Senior Aquaculturist Marinel Punzalan said on Tuesday that the office would start operations in its new home in Bukana Village inside the sprawling Cavite State University (CvSU) campus here, once equipment, office materials and supplies are in place.
Many aquaculturist are focusing towards reduction in fish meal inclusion in diet with enzyme application as done in poultry.
In an intensive culture all the nutrition (feed) required are supplied or provided by the farmer or aquaculturist in a nutritionally balanced proportion that is easily utilizable and of wholesome diet.
"The company couldn't use the water for any type of crops, and was confused as to what it should do," says Mahmoud Shokry Asfoor, an aquaculturist at the Wadi Natroun fish farm.
Working with focal residents and an oyster aquaculturist, we forced the airport to include engineering measures for controlling water pollution, and to increase its capacity for dealing with hazardous materials.
We are in the final stages of conducting a national search for a scientific aquaculturist who will oversee this exciting effort.
Purdue aquaculturist Paul Brown has created soybean and corn feeds for farm-raised fish hoping to open new markets for these grain crops.
(c) This section does not apply to any live aquatic plants or animals imported by a registered aquaculturist.
According to Corbin, Lockwood's enterprise was useful to the state as well, because as the aquaculturist adapted his abalone-raising techniques to the new setting, government officials went about amending the statute that had created NELH, to allow commercialization at the facility.