apyrase


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ap·y·rase

(ă-pī'rās),
An enzyme catalyzing hydrolytic removal of two orthophosphate residues from adenosine 5'-triphosphate to yield adenosine 5'-monophosphate; that is, ATP + 2H2O → AMP + 2Pi.

apyrase

(ăp′ə-rās′, -rāz′)
n.
Any of various enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP or ADP, producing AMP and inorganic phosphate and releasing energy.

apyrase

The official name for what is informally known as ADPase. Apyrase (EC 3.6.1.5) is the term recommended by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; however, ADPase is in common use.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
5), also known as apyrases or SmATPDases, are ecto-enzymes localized on the external tegument surface of S.
On the other hand, to determine whether the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation response to PA was mediated by extracellular nucleotides, the same type of vasorelaxant experiments in aortic rings (E+) were carried out in the presence of apyrase (0.
4C; apyrase inhibited ADP induced vasorelaxation but did not affect the vasorelaxant response to PA.
People possess an apyrase similar to the ones in bloodsucking insects, but it normally degrades compounds other than ADP.
To keep the blood flowing, creatures such as ticks and mosquitoes inject a victim with enzymes called apyrases.
Excess nucleoside triphosphates from the previous step were degraded by apyrase.
Unreacted nucleotides are degraded by apyrase, allowing iterative nucleotide addition.