APT

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APT

AntiPlatelet Trialists. A meta-analysis of 145 prospective controlled trials of antiplatelet therapy administered post myocardial infarction, stroke, or TIA, or given to patients with a positive cardiovascular history (vascular surgery, angioplasty, angina, etc).
Conclusion ±25% reduction in each category, and a trend toward decreased risk with aspirin doses of ≤325 mg/day.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

apperceptive personality test

(a″pĕr-sep′tiv),

APT

A test used to assess attitudes, moods, and perceptions. The person tested examines a series of images and is asked to construct a story about each of them.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, television remains the most undertheorized of media, but are comparisons with painting really the aptest way to go about it?
Its account of Baby Suggs, Seth, and the haunting slave-history which binds them, makes an aptest point-of-arrival to the collection overall.
The right of nature, which writer-s commonly call Jus Naturale, is the Liberty each man hath, to use his own power, as he will himselfe, for the preservation of his own Nature; that is to say, of his won life; and consequently, of doing any thing, which in his own Judgment, and Reason, hee shall conceive to be the aptest means thereunto ....(152)
The angel is the aptest possible symbol for the Renaissance, its winged flight representing the freeing of the imagination from the confines of medieval superstitions and restrictions.
A full translation into a language that does depend on words to express those elements must use the aptest pronouns, conjunctions, etc., to be clear.
There are those who denounce us openly to their own friends, and yet whisper us softly that Senator Douglas is the aptest instrument there is with which to effect that object.
(168) See Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan 79-80 (Rod Hay ed., McMaster University 1999) (1651) ("The right of nature, which writers commonly call jus naturale, is the liberty each man hath to use his own power as he will himself for the preservation of his own nature; that is to say, of his own life; and consequently, of doing anything which, in his own judgement and reason, he shall conceive to be the aptest means thereunto....
Tennyson apostrophizes Hallam: I leave thy praises unexpressed In verse that brings myself relief, And by the measure of my grief I leave thy greatness to be guessed; What practice howsoe'er expert In fitting aptest words to things, Or voice the richest-toned that sings, Hath power to give thee as thou wert?