appropriate

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appropriate

(ă-prō′prē-ăt) [L. appropriatus, made one's own]
1. In psychiatry, pert. to behavior that is suitable and congruent.
2. In medical practice, pert. to care that is expected to yield health benefits that considerably exceed risk.
References in periodicals archive ?
We have seen that the two opposing factions share an essential point: the hypostatization of Life as a fact in itself in which the living participates, the production of Life-in-itself as life in- appropriable because coincident with God, or because coincident with the private ownership of the individual who inherits the characteristics of the god of theology.
When the fairy waltzes slowly through town, deferring narrative resolution, defying all attempts to limit her to one single, unique, appropriable and exclusive appearance, she might make us start to waltz with her; to be given over, even as she gives herself to us, even as Lanval has given himself to her and to his neighbors equally.
(31) Benjamin Klein, Robert Crawford & Armen Alchian, Vertical Integration, Appropriable Rents, and the Competitive Contracting Process, 21 J.L.
Alchian (1978), "Vertical Integration, Appropriable Rents, and the Competitive Contracting Process," Journal of Law and Economics, 21 (October): pp.297-326.
dispar is nonpathogenic and its infection was treated with appropriable drug as used for E.
(1978), "Vertical integration, appropriable rents and the competitive contracting process", Journal of Law and Economics, Vol.
Capturable resource rents can lead to rent-seeking behaviour; revenues and royalties from oil or mineral resources are much more readily appropriable when compared to the income flows from agricultural commodities.
KCA claim as an empirical regularity that the lower the appropriable quasi rents, the more likely transactions will rely on a contractual relationship rather than common ownership.
Himes's fantasy of apocalyptic racial warfare is, of course, not appropriable by liberal discourse in any of its manifestations.
In place of such a claim--one that highlights the possibility or impossibility of this legacy--Derrida offers a rhetoric of survival, where survival is structural and originary, and where it generates an account of relationless relation in lieu of a transmissible, identifiable, and appropriable inheritance.
Sexual morality is returned to Inuit representations even at its most appropriable and eroticised point: the communal bed.