apprehension test

apprehension test

(ap″rē-hen′shŏn) [L. apprehendere, to grasp]
A test of joint instability. If instability is present, the patient displays concern or discomfort when a joint is put in a position of risk for dislocation. The patient will attempt to resist the maneuver by muscle contraction.

Patella: The patient lies supine with a relaxed quadriceps, and the examiner places digital pressure on the patella, attempting to locate it laterally.

Shoulder: The arm is abducted to 90° and rotated externally. With continued external rotation, the patient with an unstable shoulder expresses fear of dislocation.

References in periodicals archive ?
(9,12) Additionally, regarding instability, specialized tests include the apprehension test, relocation test, load and shift, posterior jerk, posterior load and shift, sulcus sign, and Beighton's criteria of hyperlaxity.
To determine writing apprehension scores, students were asked to take Daly and Miller's (1975) writing apprehension test at the beginning (week 1) and end of the semester (week 15) to determine their writing apprehension scores.
Table 1 Outcome Score * Function No limitation in work, slight limitation in throwing 35 baseball, serving forcefully in tennis or swimming, crawl, stroke can throw football normally Moderate limitation in overhead work, throwing 20 baseball and football, swimming, crawl, stroke or serving tennis Marked limitation in throwing in all sports, 0 unable to work with arm overhead Pain None 10 Moderate 5 Severe 0 Stability 30 Negative apprehension test, no subluxation Negative apprehension test, but discomfort with arm 15 in position of abduction and external rotation Positive apprehensive test and sense of subluxation 0 Range of Motion Full 10 25% loss of motion in any plane 5 > 25% loss of motion in any plane 0 Table 2 Author Year No.
Other tests of rotational laxity of the knee include the external rotation recurvatum test, reverse-pivot shift, posterolateral drawer, and standing apprehension test. (2) While this case highlights an isolated PLC injury, it is important to consider potential damage to the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments as 87% of PLC tears occur as part of multi-ligament injury spectrums.
The patient had patellar instability with positive apprehension test. Radiographic examination showed no evidence of fracture.
In order to answer research question 2, the study used a survey based on a validated and reliable measure of writing engagement, the Writing Apprehension Test (Daly & Miller, 1975).
In all of the patients the apprehension test was positive at the time of admission and they had undergone standard physiotherapy program without response.
During the criminal apprehension test, one judge remarked, "like a bullet" when Titan leaped fast toward the man.
On exam, she has no evidence of joint effusion but has tenderness along the patellar facets, a positive patellar apprehension test, and pain on squatting.
Research on foreign language writing anxiety has commonly used the second language version of the Daly-Miller's (1975) Writing Apprehension Test (SLWAT), the first instrument utilized to measure learners' anxiety toward and fear of writing in evaluative situations.
The Anterior Apprehension Test (Rowe and Zairns, 1981) produced pain and apprehension at 40[degrees] external rotation.