apposition

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Related to appositional: appositional growth

apposition

 [ap″o-zish´un]
the placement or position of adjacent structures or parts so that they can come into contact.

ap·po·si·tion

(ap'ō-zish'ŭn),
1. The placing in contact of two substances or structures.
2. The condition of being placed or fitted together.
3. The relationship of fracture fragments to one another.
4. The process of thickening of the cell wall.
[L. ap-pono, pp. -positus, to place at or to]

apposition

/ap·po·si·tion/ (ap″o-zish´un) juxtaposition; the placing of things in proximity; specifically, the deposition of successive layers upon those already present, as in cell walls.apposi´tional

apposition

(ăp′ə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. Grammar
a. A construction in which a noun or noun phrase is placed with another as an explanatory equivalent, both having the same syntactic relation to the other elements in the sentence; for example, Copley and the painter in The painter Copley was born in Boston.
b. The relationship between such nouns or noun phrases.
2. A placing side by side or next to each other.
3. Biology The growth of successive layers of a cell wall.

ap′po·si′tion·al adj.
ap′po·si′tion·al·ly adv.

apposition

[ap′əsish′ən]
Etymology: L, apponere, to put to
the placement of objects in proximity, as in the layering of tissue cells or juxtaposition of facing surfaces side-by-side.

ap·po·si·tion

(ap'ǒ-zish'ŭn)
1. The placing in contact of two substances.
2. The condition of being placed or fitted together.
3. The relationship of fracture fragments to one another.
4. The process of thickening of the cell wall.
5. The deposition of the matrix of the hard dental structures; enamel, dentin, and cementum.
[L. ap-pono, pp. -positus, to place at or to]

apposition

A placing of structures side by side. The term is often used in relation to the edges of wound, as in SUTURING.

apposition

growth in cell-wall thickness brought about by the successive deposition of layers of material.

ap·po·si·tion

(ap'ǒ-zish'ŭn)
1. Synonym(s): appositional growth.
2. The placing in contact of two substances or structures.
3. The condition of being placed or fitted together.
[L. ap-pono, pp. -positus, to place at or to]

apposition (ap´əzish´ən),

n 1. the condition of being placed or fitted together; juxtaposition; coaptation.
n 2. a layered formation of a firm or hard tissue such as cartilage, bone, enamel, dentin, and cementum.

apposition

the placement or position of adjacent structures or parts so that they can come into contact.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the major conclusions to be drawn from this paper is how fuzzy the boundaries between appositional types are: similar EMs may introduce different types of appositives, and the very same EM may be used in different appositional types at different points in time over the course of the history of the language.
Given the non-relationality of the prototypical noun alluded to above--they are typically leaves in a syntactic tree--complex nouns always seem to take their base in an appositional relation, simple apposition or in combination with respect for the valency of their base.
External validation of appositional disorder and attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity.
He introduces the subject with the word "state" and follows with the appositional "or age.
5,16) The trabecular bone is preserved, with moderate thickening of some of the lamellar bone trabeculae, cement lines, and appositional new bone formation or reactive sclerosis.
The former tends to appositional utterance (or to word replacement based on such predication), "my love's like a red red rose," or simply, Abie's "wild Irish rose.
In addition, these uses can be distinguished from appositional uses, which are also open to both object-denoting and property-denoting lexemes, as is illustrated in (13).
By this metaphor, every number in this hidden bright painting, not the austere drawing it seems to he, has color, a positive place, appositional to all the others, and in an actually very complex number-set rhythm.
The third goal complements RG 2 and represents the appositional aspect of heuristic model.
In young patients, appositional growth is more pronounced than in elderly.
While the arguments girili in (24) and boojabij in (25) are cross-referenced on the verb, the adverbial nglianggoowa in (24) and the appositional complex of adpositional phrase and temporal adverbial in (25) are not.
The functional classes include subject, object, antecedent, qualificative/qualifier, introductory member, complement, descriptive, predicate, head member and appositional member and coordinate member (Kruger, 2006).