application

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application

 [ap″lĭ-ka´shun]
the act of bringing something into contact or of starting an action.
heat/cold application in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as stimulation of the skin and underlying tissues with heat or cold for the purpose of decreasing pain, muscle spasms, or inflammation.

ap·pli·ca·tion

(ap-li-kā'shun),
1. The act of applying, as in bringing a medicine, dressing, or device into contact with the body surface.
2. The act of putting to a specific use, or the capacity of being so used.
3. A formal request, usually in writing.
[L. applicatio, , fr. ap-plico, to affix]

application

[ap′likā′shən]
a computer program used to process a particular type of data, such as payroll, inventory, data about patients, scheduling of procedures and activities, pharmacy requisition and control, recording of nursing notes, care planning, word processing, and spreadsheets.

application

Informatics
Computer software designed to perform a specific task, such as navigation, project management, process control, word processing, graphic design, communication, etc.

Pharmaceutical industry
A formal request for FDA review of a stage in the regulatory process of bringing a drug to market.
 
Trials
See Regulatory application.

application

Pharmaceutical industry A formal request for FDA review of a stage in the regulatory process of bringing a drug to market. See Abbreviated new drug application, IND application, NDA application, Premarket approval application, Request for application, Supplemental application Vox populi
1. A specific use.
2. A formal request, usually in writing for a position, service, or right.

ap·pli·ca·tion

(ap'li-kā'shŭn)
1. The act of applying, as in bringing a medicine, dressing, or device into contact with the body surface.
2. The act of putting to a specific use, or the capacity of being so used.
3. A formal request, usually in writing.
[L. applicatio, fr. ap-plico, to affix]

application

carrier of a topical medicament (see Table 1)
Table 1: Vehicles used to carry active ingredients for topical use in skin conditions
Vehicle typeComment
ApplicationsViscous solutions, emulsions or suspensions for application to the skin or nails
CollodionsClear paints carrying an active ingredient applied to the skin and left to dry to a flexible film (e.g. ichthammol in collodion)
CreamsEmulsions of oil and water generally well absorbed into the skin surface; creams are less greasy and easier to apply than ointments
GelsActive ingredients within a suitable hydrophilic or hydrophobic base; they have a high water content
LotionsA cooling preparation for external application, to the skin, formed as a liquid suspension often in an industrial methylated spirit or alcohol base
A shake lotion contains an insoluble powder in a liquid that must be shaken before use to disperse the powder evenly throughout the liquid medium, e.g. calamine lotion
OintmentsGreasy preparations that are usually insoluble in water; a salve or unguent; a semisolid preparation containing a medicinal agent in a fatty or waxy base, intended for topical application; the greasy base of an ointment (usually formulated from soft paraffin, or a combination of soft and hard paraffin) acts as an occlusive medium and makes it especially suitable for use on dry or anhydrous skin
Water-soluble ointments are based on macrogols and can be washed off
PastesStiff preparations containing a high proportion of fine solids, such as zinc oxide and starch; they are less occlusive than ointments and can be used to protect lichenified, inflamed or excoriated skin (e.g. in eczema)
Dusting powdersFine powders, e.g. talc, applied to apposing skin surfaces; they should not be used on moist or weeping surfaces

ap·pli·ca·tion

(ap'li-kā'shŭn)
1. Act of applying, as in bringing a medicine, dressing, or device into contact with the body surface.
2. Act of putting to specific use, or such capacity.
[L. applicatio, fr. ap-plico, to affix]
References in periodicals archive ?
The NC-1100 not only has minimal latency, it typically improves the performance of the applications it's protecting by 30 to 500 percent.
Some universities, such as Denison (Ohio), offer travel money to bring such students to campus, or assist with the completion of applications.
The BIG-IP solution's pluggable architecture incorporates a revolutionary design for inspecting, controlling, transforming, programming and scaling the various services needed to successfully deliver applications.
Today, applications housing critical business logic are usually built and deployed in some form of dedicated silo.
Future unsolicited, competing-continuation applications based on this project will compete with all investigator-initiated applications and will be reviewed according to the customary peer review procedures.
This study again proves our capability to guarantee the performance of critical applications 100% under any circumstances, "said Houda Chabir, vice president of business development.
The tight integration between hardware and software allows vendor developers unmatched scope for optimizing the speed and functionality of storage management applications.
The purpose of this PA is to invite innovative applications for 1) the development of new and improved instruments or devices, 2) the development of new methodologies using existing instruments, or 3) the development of software related to instrumentation.
XML data for web services, or on custom values for mobile applications.
5 now extends these same benefits to desktop applications like Microsoft Office 2007, allowing them to be streamed over the network to users as an on-demand service, much like downloaded music or videos.
Imagine instead if that same application operated independent of connectivity, much like Microsoft Word or other typical desktop applications.
A quick review of the WASC threat classification database indicates how diverse and pernicious attacks against enterprise applications have become.

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