applanation

(redirected from applanate)

ap·pla·na·tion

(ap'lan-ā'shŭn),
In tonometry, the flattening of the cornea by pressure. Intraocular pressure is directly proportional to external pressure, and inversely proportional to the area flattened.
See also: applanation tonometer.
[L. ad, toward, + planum, plane]

ap·pla·na·tion

(ap'lă-nā'shŭn)
tonometry The flattening of the cornea by pressure. Intraocular pressure is directly proportional to external pressure, and inversely proportional to the area flattened.
See also: applanation tonometer
[L. ad, toward, + planum, plane]

applanation

(ap″lă-nā′shŏn) [L. applanare, to flatten]
Flattening, esp. of the corneal surface.
applanate (ap′lă-nāt″, a-plā′nāt″)
References in periodicals archive ?
Stromata effused, applanate to pulvinate; 0.7-80 mm long x 0.5-40 mm broad x 0.8-1 mm thick, with inconspicuous perithecial mounds up to 1/4 exposed; surface Umber (9) with grey tones when young, becoming black to blackish when old; brown to black granules immediately beneath surface, brown granules detected by microscopic examination in water; KOH-extractable pigments pale Olivaceous Grey (121); the tissue below the perithecial layer inconspicuous, black.
It is characterized by effused, applanate to pulvinate blackish stromata with brown tones when young, inconspicuous up to 1/4 exposed perithecial mounds; ostiolar truncatum-type discs; amyloid apical rings and brown ellipsoid-inequilateral ascospores with straight germ slits spore-length and dehiscent perispore in KOH.
It is reasonable to suggest that a relatively applanate, or an outgrown condylar head, could lead to a Type A condylar head fracture after a parasymphyseal impact.
A tunnel created with the IntraLase should run parallel to the corneal surfaces because it is prepared while the cornea is applanate by the optical interface.
The Imbert-Fick principle states that the IOP can be estimated indirectly via measuring the force required to applanate or 'flatten' a known area of the cornea.
(42) Like GAT, it measures the force required to applanate the cornea, though instead achieves applanation via the rapid application of a collimated air-pulse.
Other than the ascomata opening by a flat circular lid, the family was characterized by bitunicate and fissitunicate, clavate or ellipsoidal, short pedicellate asci, and applanate or rarely cylindrical ascospores with three or more transverse septa with or without longitudinal septa and usually with a thick sheath and frequently circular in section but narrowing to one end [1,2].
However, different species and species aggregates are involved in the Northern Andes (e.g., linear-lobed species of Hypotrachyna) and in southeastern Brazil (e.g., applanate species of Hypotrachyna and Cladonia species of the C.
All methods of applanation tonometry, both noncontact and contact, obey the Imbert-Fick law, [9-10] which states that the force required to applanate the cornea is proportional to the IOP.
The device was first introduced around 1957 and it is based on the Imbert-Fick principle, which states that for a fluid-filled encapsulated sphere, the pressure of the fluid within the sphere is proportional to the force required to applanate an external area of the sphere.
GAT operates via the Imbert-Fick principle--this principle states that the IOP can be estimated indirectly via measuring the force required to applanate or "flatten" a given area of the cornea.