appetite

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Related to appetitive: appetitive behavior

appetite

 [ap´ĕ-tīt]
the desire for food, stimulated by the sight, smell, or thought of food and accompanied by the flow of saliva in the mouth and gastric juice in the stomach. The stomach wall also receives an extra blood supply in preparation for its digestive activity. Appetite is psychological, dependent on memory and associations, as compared with hunger, which is physiologically aroused by the body's need for food. Lack or loss of appetite, known as anorexia, may be due to subjectively unpleasant food, surroundings, or company, or a symptom of either a physical disorder or an emotional disturbance. Excessive appetite may be an indication of either a metabolic disorder or an emotional disturbance.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt),
A desire or motive derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection; a desire or longing to satisfy any conscious physical or mental need.
Synonym(s): orexia (2)
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

major depressive disorder

Psychiatry A chronic, relapsing illness affecting 3–6% of the population at a given time Lifetime risk 10–15%; it is linked to a high–10% to 20% rate of suicide, and high morbidity when compared with other medical illness Statistics, Intl, low Taiwan 1.5%, Korea 3%, Puerto Rico 4.3%, US 5% High Lebanon 19%, France 16.4%, New Zealand 12% Other findings Positive dexamethasone test, sleep changes–eg, ↓ REM latency DiffDx AIDS, acute intermittent porphyria, amphetamine withdrawal, CA, endocrine disease–eg, Addision's disease, Cushing's disease, hypothyroidism, infectious mononucleosis, influenza, malnutrition, multiple sclerosis, drugs–eg, alpha-methyldopa, benzodiazepines, cimetidine, clonidine, corticosteroids, INH, OCs, propranolol, reserpine, thiazide diuretics
Major depressive disorder, 5 or more criteria
appetite or loss of weight
concentration
• Dysphoric mood Sad, anxious, irritable
• Fatigue or decreased energy
• Guilt or excessive self blame
interest in pleasurable activities
• Psychomotor retardation or agitation
• Sleep disturbances
• Suicidal ideation or suicidal attempt  AMN  16/9/96, p17
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt)
A desire or motive derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection; a desire or longing to satisfy any conscious physical or mental need.
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

appetite

Desire, whether for food, drink, sex, work or anything else that humans can enjoy. Lack of appetite for food is called anorexia, of which a particularly dangerous kind is ANOREXIA NERVOSA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Appetite

The natural instinctive desire for food. It should be distinguished from hunger, which is the body's craving or need for food (either calories or specific nutrients).
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt)
A desire derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection.
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The appetitive reaction is said to evoke a multitude of approach responses due to various system stimulation.
Allied with this is the oft-repeated notion that stuffing one's stomach (al-bitnah) vitiates the intelligence, debilitates bodily health, renders the heart obdurate and impenitent, and aids appetitive craving to subvert faith; ibid, [section][section]82, 158, 160, 168, 171, 176.
Research using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has identified networks of disparate brain regions involved in executive control and others involved in appetitive drive.
The question then becomes, at what level of leptin or at what weight or at what amount of weight loss would the resistance begin to subside, thus allowing those undergoing weight loss to experience the weight regulating benefits of leptin and possibly of appetitive hormones regulated by leptin.
According to the motivational priming hypothesis, the observed affective modulation of the startle responses during perception reflected the activation of appetitive and defensive motivational systems, respectively (Lang et al., 1997).
Shrimp were purchased at local food stores, soaked in SW for 3 h to lessen their attractiveness by leaching out appetitive chemicals, freeze-dried, then cut into pieces of about 2 cm X 0.5 cm.
Our short stay definitely whetted our appetitive for a lengthier dose of Languedoc.
In counter-conditioning, for example, a new positive (i.e., appetitive) stimulus is paired with a stimulus that had previously evoked a fear response (e.g., Wilson, 1973).
Brennan analyzes the psychic function of spirit and the characteristic object of spirited desire, and he persuasively develops the view that--from the perspective of the creator gods of the Timaeus, who created the human soul with a view to making it best--the inclusion of the spirited part in the soul was a necessary response to the inclusion of the appetitive part (which was itself necessary for the purpose of biological maintenance).
Moreover, if such conditioning does occur (i.e., anticipated salivation prior to food entering the mouth), then one's oral cavity is prepared to both enhance further appetitive experiences as well as more efficiently break down food for digestion (Mese & Matsuo, 2007; Pederson, Bardow, Beier Jensen & Nauntofte, 2002).