appetite

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appetite

 [ap´ĕ-tīt]
the desire for food, stimulated by the sight, smell, or thought of food and accompanied by the flow of saliva in the mouth and gastric juice in the stomach. The stomach wall also receives an extra blood supply in preparation for its digestive activity. Appetite is psychological, dependent on memory and associations, as compared with hunger, which is physiologically aroused by the body's need for food. Lack or loss of appetite, known as anorexia, may be due to subjectively unpleasant food, surroundings, or company, or a symptom of either a physical disorder or an emotional disturbance. Excessive appetite may be an indication of either a metabolic disorder or an emotional disturbance.

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt),
A desire or motive derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection; a desire or longing to satisfy any conscious physical or mental need.
Synonym(s): orexia (2)
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]

major depressive disorder

Psychiatry A chronic, relapsing illness affecting 3–6% of the population at a given time Lifetime risk 10–15%; it is linked to a high–10% to 20% rate of suicide, and high morbidity when compared with other medical illness Statistics, Intl, low Taiwan 1.5%, Korea 3%, Puerto Rico 4.3%, US 5% High Lebanon 19%, France 16.4%, New Zealand 12% Other findings Positive dexamethasone test, sleep changes–eg, ↓ REM latency DiffDx AIDS, acute intermittent porphyria, amphetamine withdrawal, CA, endocrine disease–eg, Addision's disease, Cushing's disease, hypothyroidism, infectious mononucleosis, influenza, malnutrition, multiple sclerosis, drugs–eg, alpha-methyldopa, benzodiazepines, cimetidine, clonidine, corticosteroids, INH, OCs, propranolol, reserpine, thiazide diuretics
Major depressive disorder, 5 or more criteria
appetite or loss of weight
concentration
• Dysphoric mood Sad, anxious, irritable
• Fatigue or decreased energy
• Guilt or excessive self blame
interest in pleasurable activities
• Psychomotor retardation or agitation
• Sleep disturbances
• Suicidal ideation or suicidal attempt  AMN  16/9/96, p17

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt)
A desire or motive derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection; a desire or longing to satisfy any conscious physical or mental need.
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]

appetite

Desire, whether for food, drink, sex, work or anything else that humans can enjoy. Lack of appetite for food is called anorexia, of which a particularly dangerous kind is ANOREXIA NERVOSA.

Appetite

The natural instinctive desire for food. It should be distinguished from hunger, which is the body's craving or need for food (either calories or specific nutrients).

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt)
A desire derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection.
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]
References in periodicals archive ?
"This is largely down to their genes; some babies are born with a hearty appetite, want to feed regularly, and are more demanding about being fed.
But often, an appetite can come back even when we have eaten enough.
The researchers discovered that older adults with poor appetites ate much less protein and dietary fiber.
"Lenders' appetites for loans remain very strong; and with the 10-year loans made during 2005, 2006 and 2007 maturing, lenders also anticipate growing demand from borrowers."
Q: I don't have much of an appetite, and I don't like to force myself to eat when I'm not hungry.
RiskRadius, a provider of tools to insurance carriers and insurance brokers, introduces a risk appetite search engine.
A thorough nutritional history assessment includes details such as a resident's height, weight, body mass index (BMI), medications, labs, caloric intake, food likes and dislikes, portion sizes, food restrictions, ethnic or religious food specifications, appetite, nourishment needs, swallowing problems, and dental evaluation.
Zhao and his colleagues suspected that, in obese people, some substance might prevent leptin from stimulating receptors in the brain that affect appetite. After analyzing rat and human blood, the researchers homed in on C-reactive protein (CRP), a substance that's associated with inflammation and has been found in higher-than-normal concentrations in obese people.
While Gibson's Passion served up supersized portions of blood and guts, satisfying even the hungriest appetites for cinematic violence, Kinsey is not really a very sexy movie.
For example, dietary and moral reformers harbored fears that those who indulged their appetites for sugary treats might subsequently develop far more dangerous appetites--for cigarettes, alcohol, or sexual pleasure.
Risk appetites swell as the boom succeeds, and in the end a full-fledged mania takes hold.