appetite


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

appetite

 [ap´ĕ-tīt]
the desire for food, stimulated by the sight, smell, or thought of food and accompanied by the flow of saliva in the mouth and gastric juice in the stomach. The stomach wall also receives an extra blood supply in preparation for its digestive activity. Appetite is psychological, dependent on memory and associations, as compared with hunger, which is physiologically aroused by the body's need for food. Lack or loss of appetite, known as anorexia, may be due to subjectively unpleasant food, surroundings, or company, or a symptom of either a physical disorder or an emotional disturbance. Excessive appetite may be an indication of either a metabolic disorder or an emotional disturbance.

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt),
A desire or motive derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection; a desire or longing to satisfy any conscious physical or mental need.
Synonym(s): orexia (2)
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]

appetite1

[ap′ətīt]
Etymology: L, appetere, to long for
a natural or instinctive desire, such as for food.

appetite2

a nursing outcome from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) defined as desire to eat when ill or receiving treatment. See also Nursing Outcomes Classification.

major depressive disorder

Psychiatry A chronic, relapsing illness affecting 3–6% of the population at a given time Lifetime risk 10–15%; it is linked to a high–10% to 20% rate of suicide, and high morbidity when compared with other medical illness Statistics, Intl, low Taiwan 1.5%, Korea 3%, Puerto Rico 4.3%, US 5% High Lebanon 19%, France 16.4%, New Zealand 12% Other findings Positive dexamethasone test, sleep changes–eg, ↓ REM latency DiffDx AIDS, acute intermittent porphyria, amphetamine withdrawal, CA, endocrine disease–eg, Addision's disease, Cushing's disease, hypothyroidism, infectious mononucleosis, influenza, malnutrition, multiple sclerosis, drugs–eg, alpha-methyldopa, benzodiazepines, cimetidine, clonidine, corticosteroids, INH, OCs, propranolol, reserpine, thiazide diuretics
Major depressive disorder, 5 or more criteria
appetite or loss of weight
concentration
• Dysphoric mood Sad, anxious, irritable
• Fatigue or decreased energy
• Guilt or excessive self blame
interest in pleasurable activities
• Psychomotor retardation or agitation
• Sleep disturbances
• Suicidal ideation or suicidal attempt  AMN  16/9/96, p17

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt)
A desire or motive derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection; a desire or longing to satisfy any conscious physical or mental need.
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]

appetite

Desire, whether for food, drink, sex, work or anything else that humans can enjoy. Lack of appetite for food is called anorexia, of which a particularly dangerous kind is ANOREXIA NERVOSA.

Appetite

The natural instinctive desire for food. It should be distinguished from hunger, which is the body's craving or need for food (either calories or specific nutrients).

appetite

the drive to eat. Influenced by the status of energy balance, psychological and behavioural factors and by health status. It may be increased or decreased pharmacologically. The drive to eat can be evaluated by using visual analogue scales (VAS) for self-report ratings of hunger, desire to eat, prospective food consumption (how much food one could eat), satiety and fullness. See also anorexia, bulimia, hypothalamus.

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt)
A desire derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection.
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]

appetite

the desire for food. It is stimulated by the sight, smell or thought of food and accompanied by the flow of saliva in the mouth and gastric juice in the stomach. Appetite is psychological, dependent on memory and associations, as compared with hunger, which is physiologically aroused by the body's need for food. Its existence in animals can only be conjectured on the response in the form of food intake. Chronic loss of appetite is known as anorexia.

decreased appetite
depraved appetite
see pica. Called also allotriophagia.
increased appetite
salt appetite
the appetite for salt displayed by animals, especially ruminants, at pasture. Used in the manangement of cattle on extensive range. See also salting.
appetite stimulants
there are several methods available. Bitters such as gentian and pulv. nux. vomica exert some effect in ruminants, probably by stimulating alimentary tract mucosa. Anabolic steroids are sometimes used for this purpose in dogs and cats. A nutritional deficiency of zinc or the B vitamin complex depresses acuity of appetite and dietary supplementation with it can be effective as an appetite stimulant. Suppression of the medullary satiety center by barbiturates and benzodiazepines is also recommended. There are no well-regarded stimulants of the hunger center of the lateral hypothalamus.
References in periodicals archive ?
The following techniques are natural, risk-free methods to suppress appetite.
Based on previous studies, some pediatricians in Iran prescribe folic acid empirically as an appetite enhancer for low-weight children with poor appetite.
To investigate the effects of phenylalanine on appetite and gut hormone release, Professor Kevin Murphy and colleagues at Imperial College London, examined the effect of the amino acid on food intake and brain activity in areas known to be involved in appetite regulation.
For example, one option is to use a "flexible risk appetite.
A survey by the UAE central bank has said that the nation's credit appetite is falling.
So if protein is satisfying, and umami signals the presence of protein, UK scientists wanted to know whether the presence of umami taste itself can lessen our appetite.
Yet insurers said that further improvements to their risk appetite and risk tolerance statements are needed.
The time of exercise may influence its effect on appetite too, but there are only a few studies carried out in this regard.
They expected to find that when cannabinoids did so, the receptors sent out a signal quieting nearby neurons that suppress appetite.
Four out of five (83 percent) anticipate a "very strong" appetite among firms to make loans, while 50 percent anticipate a "very strong" appetite among borrowers to take out loans.
html) Sydney Morning Herald , the Scottish researchers found that swimmers had a bigger appetite in comparison to those who exercised on land.
A: Actually, a recent study published in the journal Appetite found that seniors who had fair or poor appetites had higher risks of dying than people with good appetites.