appendicular skeleton


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ap·pen·dic·u·lar skel·e·ton

[TA]
the bones of the limbs including the shoulder and pelvic girdles.
Synonym(s): skeleton appendiculare [TA]

appendicular skeleton

A term that dignifies the bones of appendages (extremities), including those of the shoulder girdle, upper extremity, pelvis and lower extremities.

ap·pen·dic·u·lar skel·e·ton

(ap'ĕn-dik'yŭ-lăr skel'ĕ-tŏn) [TA]
The bones of the limbs including the shoulder and pelvic girdles.

appendicular skeleton

The bones of the shoulder girdle and arms and of the pelvic girdle and legs. Compare AXIAL SKELETON.

appendicular skeleton

the part of the skeleton attached to the vertebral column, i.e. the limbs or fins.
References in periodicals archive ?
[8] Although our study showed no statistically significant difference between experienced radiographers and the radiologist in the reporting of adult fractures of the appendicular skeleton, the sensitivity achieved (89.7%) represents an unacceptably high rate of error, [8,9] with non-detection of 1/10 fractures.
Radiographic interpretation of the appendicular skeleton: A comparison between casualty officers, nurse practitioners and radiographers.
BMD was measured from the appendicular skeleton like femoral neck, and also in Ward's triangle, and for axial skeleton from L1 - 5 lumbar spines.
Osseous bridging between the axial and appendicular skeleton might be seen in advanced stages.
Though few reports of osteosarcoma are available for birds, it appears to occur more frequently in the appendicular skeleton. Previous reports have described it to occur in long bones such as the radius, humerus, femur, tibiotarsus, and tarsometatarsus, localizing to the proximal and distal portions of the bone.
Bony metastasis, in general, present in axial or proximal appendicular skeleton in patients who are more than 40 years of age while primary bone tumors usually occur in the appendicular skeleton in patients younger than 40 years (4).
Batson described the valveless venous plexus commonly thought to contribute to the spread of breast and prostate carcinoma to sites in the axial and appendicular skeleton. More recently, studies suggest some of the mechanisms for bone destruction once tumor cells have gained access to a distant site.
Radiographically, the appendicular skeleton revealed well defined trabeculae, no thinning of the cortices and sufficient mineralization to permit visualization of all components.
This lesion typically affects the appendicular skeleton in children but is found more axially in adolescents.
Sections two to four focus on the joint complexes associated with the axial and appendicular skeletons. The second section which covers the axial skeleton includes the vertebral column, the thorax and chest wall and the temperomandibular joint.