appendagitis

appendagitis

An older, nonspecific term for inflammation of any “appendage” (e.g., epiploic appendages); now known as epiploic appendices (appendices epiploicae [NA6]).
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Further imaging with an intravenous contrast enhanced CT scan of the abdomen showed a hyperdense rim lesion anteriorly, adjacent to the sigmoid colon in the left lower quadrant, along with inflammatory stranding that was consistent with epiploic appendagitis (EA) (Figure 1B).
Epiploic appendagitis mimics acute abdomen or is a condition associated with acute abdomen, although it is usually not treated by emergent surgical intervention and has characteristic findings on computed tomography (1).
However, several surgical and medical emergencies, including appendicitis, mesenteric lymphadenitis, epiploic appendagitis, and sclerosing mesenteritis may clinically resemble renal stone complaints.
Epiploic appendagitis is a relatively rare inflammatory condition of the fat-filled serosal outpouchings of the colon resulting from the obstruction of blood flow within the tissue [1, 2].
Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain caused by inflammation of an epiploic appendage.
CT scans are routinely performed nowadays both to diagnose acute appendicitis and to identify mimics such as right ureteric calculus, epiploic appendagitis, torsion of a Meckel's diverticulum, mesenteric adenitis, inflammatory bowel disease, colitis, gynaecological disorders, and right-sided diverticulitis [4].
Fat stranding that is disproportionately more severe than the degree of wall thickening is a finding that suggests inflammatory diseases such as diverticulitis, appendicitis, or epiploic appendagitis.
The clinical differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain depends on age and localization of the pain and includes acute pancreatitis, acute appendicitis, cholecystitis, gastroduodenal ulcer, diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, and other intra-abdominal inflammatory conditions.
Inflammation of epiploic appendices, primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA), is a rare cause of acute abdomen.
CT showed a pericolic oval lesion of fat attenuation with a hyper-attenuating ring and central dot sign in the same region that was diagnostic for epiploic appendagitis (EA); (Figure 2).
Objective: Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is a rare entity caused by the inflammation of the appendix epiploica.