apparatus

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apparatus

 [ap″ah-rat´tus] (pl. appara´tus, apparatuses)
an arrangement of a number of parts acting together to perform a special function.
Golgi apparatus see golgi apparatus.
juxtaglomerular apparatus a collective term for the juxtaglomerular cells in a nephron.
lacrimal apparatus see lacrimal apparatus.
Wangensteen's apparatus a nasal suction apparatus connected with a duodenal tube for aspirating gas and fluid from stomach and intestine.

ap·pa·ra·tus

(ap'ă-rā'tŭs), The plural of this word is apparatus, not apparati.
1. A collection of instruments adapted for a special purpose.
See also: system.
2. An instrument made up of several parts.
See also: system.
3. A group or system of glands, ducts, blood vessels, muscles, or other anatomic structures involved in the performance of some function.
See also: system.
[L. equipment. fr. ap-paro, pp. -atus, to prepare]

apparatus

(ăp′ə-răt′əs, -rā′təs)
n. pl. apparatus or apparat·uses
1.
a. An appliance or device for a particular purpose: an x-ray apparatus.
b. An integrated group of materials or devices used for a particular purpose: dental apparatus.
2. Physiology A group or system of organs that collectively perform a specific function or process: the respiratory apparatus; the digestive apparatus.

apparatus

Anatomy
An integrated group of structurally and functionally linked parts (including muscles, nerves, blood and lymphatic vessels, glands, stroma and so on) which act in concert to perform a particular function, as in digestion, which is performed by the alimentary apparatus (now preferentially known as the GI tract).

The use and translation of the anatomic term apparatus has proven problematic, as each information consumer views the scope (structure and function) of an apparatus in a distinct manner, and there are number of translations thereof (i.e., organs, system and tract).
 
The traditional and formally sanctioned uses of the term apparatus notwithstanding, ultimately the term system (as applied to the digestive, respiratory and urogenital apparatuses) is increasingly preferred.

Technology
A structurally and functionally integrated device used to perform a particular task.

ap·pa·ra·tus

(ap'ă-rat'ŭs)
1. A collection of instruments adapted for a special purpose.
2. An instrument made up of several parts.
3. A group or system of glands, ducts, blood vessels, muscles, or other anatomic structures involved in the performance of some function.
See also: system
[L. equipment. fr. ap-paro, pp. -atus, to prepare]

ap·pa·ra·tus

(ap'ă-rat'ŭs) The plural of this word is apparatus, not apparati.
1. [TA] A collection of instruments adapted for a special purpose.
2. An instrument made up of several parts.
3. [TA] A group or system of glands, ducts, blood vessels, muscles, or other anatomic structures involved in the performance of some function.
See also: system
[L. equipment. fr. ap-paro, pp. -atus, to prepare]
References in periodicals archive ?
Except in rare instances, the dominant systems of mobility tend to reassert themselves in those spaces, and most people go back to living their lives in, through, and at the edges of the standard apparatuses of control and networks of power.
As Agamben suggests, the apparatuses of control through and with which individuals live in modern societies tend not to form subjects of any sort; rather, they seem to operate and circulate primarily through means of desubjectification.
The individuals who occupy them for short periods of time seem to be swept back in, without resistance, to the dominant apparatuses and technologies of modern society.
Such situations of anxiety and precarity might seem to close the gap between being and action altogether, making individuals indistinct from the variety of beings they become by way of apparatuses. But the kinds of desubjectified positions we occupy within control societies are often so fleeting, so insubstantial as to tear apart and forcefully re-open that gap between being and action.
Agamben's ultimate concern here, however, is that contemporary control and apparatuses are "leading us to catastrophe" (24), and human beings today (the populations that are the most docile and cowardly in history) seem to lack the wherewithal to intervene and contest this trajectory.
To explain these claims, let me return to the original ontological framework that Agamben proposes when advancing his own analysis of apparatuses. Agamben outlines a partition between living beings (substances, individuals) on the one hand, and apparatuses of an extremely wide variety on the other hand, with subjects emerging as a third category at the interstices of the interaction between living beings and apparatuses.
One of the first points that comes into view, a point that is often occluded in Agamben's work (and often in Foucault's as well), is that many of the apparatuses with which we are concerned (whether we are considering those that belong to disciplinary regimes or those that are characteristic of networks of control) have their origins in the domination and control of the nonhuman world.

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