apothecary

(redirected from apothecaries)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to apothecaries: Apothecaries weight

pharmacist

 [fahr´mah-sist]
a person licensed to prepare, compound, and dispense drugs upon written order (prescription) from a licensed practitioner such as a physician, dentist, or advanced practice nurse. A pharmacist is a health care professional who cooperates with, consults with, and sometimes advises the licensed practitioner concerning drugs.

For a licensed pharmacist, five years of education is a minimum, and some curricula require six years. This gives the pharmacist advanced knowledge of the chemical and physical properties of drugs and their available dosage forms, and he or she is thus qualified to play a key role in supplying information about drugs (both prescription and over-the-counter) to patients—those to whom such information is most important. Since the pharmacist may be the last health care professional to communicate with the patient or a significant other before the medication is taken, he or she is therefore in an ideal position to discuss the drug with those concerned. The discussion may include any side effects associated with the drug, its stability under various conditions, its toxicity, its dosage, and its route of administration, all of which may be reassuring to the patient and be of benefit in helping insure patient compliance with the drug regimen.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·poth·e·car·y

(ă-poth'ĕ-kār-ē),
Obsolescent term for pharmacist or druggist.
[G. apothēkē, a barn, storehouse, fr. apo, from, + thēkē, a box]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

apothecary

(ə-pŏth′ĭ-kĕr′ē)
n. pl. apothecar·ies
1. One that prepares and sells drugs and other medicines; a pharmacist.
2. See pharmacy.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

apothecary

A long-obsolete term for:
(1) Pharmacist, chemist (British), druggist;
(2) Pharmacy, chemist (place).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

apothecary

An old-fashioned term for a pharmaceutical chemist. Apothecaries used to prepare their own medicines but this practice has now largely died out.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(21) For a fascinating dissection of an early modern 'culture of cosmetics', see Farah Karim-Cooper's Cosmetics in Shakespearean and Renaissance Drama, Edinburgh, 2006; see especially her discussion of cosmetic recipe manuals and apothecaries, 55-56.
(33) David Kathman's research into 'Freemen and Apprentices in Elizabethan Theatre' identifies the trade affiliations of specific apprentices and players, listing several bound to the Grocers or Apothecaries. He notes, however, that actual occupations might not correspond to an association with a livery company.
The History of the Society of Apothecaries of London.
For some good accounts of the struggle between physicians and apothecaries, see Barrett 110-18 or Copeman 43-49.
These include fine apothecaries' jars, silver plate, books, and paintings.
The apothecaries carefully maintained the official procedures, as they do today.
Apothecaries dispensed the freshly made mummies in several forms, including ground, powdered, and diced preparations.
As part of its diversification of interest,Middleton has a garden based on the herbal remedies of the famous Meddygon Myddfai, the Carmarthenshire family of physicians or apothecaries, whose descendents are still with us.
There can be no effort without health; there can be no health without temperance in a man's nature,''counselled the Lady through her apothecaries.
She emphasizes the number and variety of health care providers in the early modem era including itinerant and village healers, surgeons, apothecaries, midwives and, of course, physicians.
Jones offers an even more sympathetic account of the sisters of charity, women from modest backgrounds who devoted themselves to lives of service to the needy; they not only transformed (and feminized) nursing services in the hospitals, but acted as "independent medical practitioners in their own right", bleeding and bandaging patients and running hospital dispensaries, which largely displaced local apothecaries as providers of remedies for the poor.
However her life straddles the tense juncture between three professions: university-trained doctors surgeons who learn their trade on the battlefield and the apothecaries. It is upon this landscape that Lilly finds her true place in the world.