aponeurosis

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aponeurosis

 [ap″o-noo͡-ro´sis] (pl. aponeuro´ses)
a sheetlike tendinous expansion, mainly serving to connect a muscle with the parts it moves. adj., adj aponeurot´ic.
 Palmar aponeurosis. A fifth longitudinal band, radiating toward the base of the thumb, is sometimes present. From Dorland's, 2000.

ap·o·neu·ro·sis

, pl.

ap·o·neu·ro·ses

(ap'ō-nū-rō'sis, -sēz), [TA]
A fibrous sheet or flat, expanded tendon, giving attachment to muscular fibers and serving as the means of proximal or distal attachment (origin or insertion) of a flat muscle; it sometimes also performs the functions of a fascia for other muscles.
[G. the end of the muscle where it becomes tendon, fr. apo, from, + neuron, sinew]

aponeurosis

(ăp′ə-no͝o-rō′sĭs, -nyo͝o-)
n. pl. aponeuro·ses (-sēz′)
A sheetlike fibrous membrane, resembling a flattened tendon, that serves as a fascia to bind muscles together or as a means of connecting muscle to bone.

ap′o·neu·rot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.

aponeurosis

Anatomy A flat sheet of fibrotendinous tissue which forms the site of attachment of flat muscles or corresponds to a zone of separation of flat muscles. See Bicipital aponeurosis, Plantar aponeurosis.

ap·o·neu·ro·sis

, pl. aponeuroses (ap'ō-nūr-ō'sis, -sēz) [TA]
A fibrous sheet or flat, expanded tendon, giving attachment to muscular fibers and serving as the means of origin or insertion of a flat muscle; it sometimes also performs the functions of a fascia for other muscles.
[G. the end of the muscle where it becomes tendon, fr. apo, from, + neuron, sinew]

aponeurosis

A thin flat sheet of tendinous tissue which covers a muscle or by which broad, flat muscles are connected to bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mandahl, "Absence of mutations of the BRAF gene in malignant melanoma of soft parts (clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses)," Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, vol.
Debiec-Rychter et al., "Molecular genetic characterization of the EWS/ATF1 fusion gene in clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses," International Journal of Cancer, vol.
The tumor shows infiltration into the tendons and aponeuroses.
The tumor is highly infiltrative and organized in a haphazard arrangement into small compact nests and fascicles of uniform neoplastic cells dissecting along the dense fibrous connective tissue of tendons, fascia, and aponeuroses. (1,4,18) The stroma may be barely visible, fibrotic, or hyalinized.
Clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses is characterized by the reciprocal chromosome translocation, t(12;22)(q13;q12), which can be detected by conventional chromosome analysis (Figure 5), FISH, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.
The differential diagnosis of a tumor located in close proximity to tendons and aponeuroses in an extremity includes the recently described paraganglioma-like dermal melanocytic tumor, clear cell myomelanocytic tumor, MM, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and synovial sarcoma, especially the monophasic type.
Clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses: an analysis of 21 cases.
Clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses: an immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis indicating neural crest origin.
Cytogenetic findings in clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses: malignant melanoma of soft parts.
Reciprocal translocation t(12; 22)(q13;q13) in clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses. Genes Chromosomes Cancer.
Clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses (malignant melanoma of soft parts) and cutaneous melanoma: exploring the histogenetic relationship between these two clinicopathological entities.
Biomechanical properties of normal tendons, normal palmar aponeuroses and tissues from patients with Dupuytren's contracture subjected to elastase and chondroitinase treatment.