apnea-hypopnea index

(redirected from apnoea-hypopnoea index)

respiratory disturbance index (RDI),

a calculation of the average number of incidents of hypopnea and apnea per hour of sleep, as measured by polysomnography. A few sleep laboratories use this term to refer to any disturbance during sleep, including leg movements, snoring, and other phenomena, but such usage is generally discouraged by experts in the field.

ap·ne·a-hy·pop·ne·a in·dex

(AHI) (ap'nē-ă-hī-pop'nē-ă in'deks)
The number of apneic and hypopneic episodes combined per hour of sleep.
Synonym(s): apnoea-hypopnoea index.

apnea-hypopnea index

Abbreviation: AHI
The number of times in an hour when a sleeping person either stops breathing completely or has limited airflow. Each episode must last at least 10 sec. The AHI is one indicator of obstructive sleep apnea, although it is recognized as an imperfect diagnostic tool. An AHI of 30 or more events in an hour indicates severe sleep apnea; 15 to 29 events suggests moderate apnea; and 5 to 14 events indicates mild apnea.
See also: index

res·pi·ra·to·ry dis·turb·ance in·dex

(respir-ă-tōr-ē dis-tŭrbăns indeks)
A calculation of the average number of incidents of hypopnea and apnea per hour of sleep, as measured by polysomnography.
Synonym(s): apnea-hypopnea index.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is referred to as the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI).
The patients were divided into four equal groups: Group 1 - snoring without apnoea (age 20- 40); Group 2 - snoring without apnoea (age 40-60); Group 3 - apnoea-hypopnoea index less than 5/hr; Group 4: apnoea- hypopnoea index greater than 30/hr.
2 SO2 < 90 ESS, Epworth sleepiness scale (maximum score=24); AHI, apnoea-hypopnoea index measured by polysomnography * Up to 10 yr of education; ([dagger]) more than 10 yr of education; ([double dagger]) number of arousals identified by EEG averaged per hour, assessed during PSG Numbers in parentheses are percentages Table III.
Apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) was calculated based on the following formula: AHI = (total no.
Epidemiologic studies suggest a high prevalence of both obstructive and central sleep apnoeas, in the elderly (1-6,8-11), with a significant association between age and apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI, number of apnoeas and hypopnoeas per hour of sleep).
Sleep apnoea severity is assessed with apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), which is the number of apnoeas and hypopnoeas per hour of sleep.
A cross-sectional analysis of data from 265 female and 346 male middle- and older-aged adults enrolled in the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study (17) showed that number of lapses and the number of false responses in the PVT correlated with the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), independent of gender and obesity among participants > 65 yr in age.
The diagnosis of OSA is confirmed when a person has an apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI; number of apnoeas and hypopnoeas per hour of sleep) > 5 events/h associated with symptoms of excessive daytime sleepiness (1).
The apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) is the total number of apnoeas and hypopnoeas during sleep divided by the total number of sleep hours.
In the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study, a population-based study of American workers, the prevalence of moderate to severe OSA [defined as an apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) > 15 events/h of sleep] among women, 30-39 yr old was 4.
It is agreed that an apnoea-hypopnoea index greater than 1 is abnormal in a child (3,4).