aplasia

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aplasia

 [ah-pla´zhah]
defective development or complete absence of an organ due to failure of development of the embryonic tissues or cells. 2. a hematologic disorder in which the normal progression of cell generation and development does not occur.

a·pla·si·a

(ā-plā'zē-ă),
1. Defective development or congenital absence of an organ or tissue.
2. In hematology, incomplete, retarded, or defective development, or cessation of the usual regenerative process.
[G. a- priv. + plasis, a molding]

aplasia

/apla·sia/ (ah-pla´zhah) lack of development of an organ or tissue.aplas´tic
aplasia axia´lis extracortica´lis conge´nita  familial centrolobar sclerosis.
aplasia cu´tis conge´nita  localized failure of development of skin, most commonly of the scalp; the defects are usually covered by a thin translucent membrane or scar tissue, or may be raw, ulcerated, or covered by granulation tissue; usually lethal.

aplasia

(ə-plā′zhə)
n.
Defective development resulting in the absence of all or part of an organ or tissue.

aplasia

[əplā′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, a, plassein, not to form
1 a developmental failure resulting in the absence of an organ or tissue.
2 (in hematology) a failure of the normal process of cell generation and development in the bone marrow. See also aplastic anemia.Compare hyperplasia,hypoplasia. aplastic, adj.

aplasia

Absence of tissue or organ development.

aplasia

Absence of tissue or organ development. See Pure red cell aplasia, Pure white cell aplasia. Cf Atrophy, Hypoplasia.

a·pla·si·a

(ă-plā'zē-ă)
1. Defective development or congenital absence of an organ or tissue.
2. hematology Incomplete, retarded, or defective development, or cessation of the usual regenerative process.
[G. a- priv. + plasis, a molding]

aplasia

Failure of the development of an organ or tissue or its congenital absence.

aplasia

the failure of all or part of a tissue or organ to develop.

aplasia

defective development or congenital absence of an organ or tissue

a·pla·si·a

(ă-plā'zē-ă)
Defective development or congenital absence of an organ or tissue.
[G. a- priv. + plasis, a molding]

aplasia (əplā´zhə),

n a lack of origin or development (e.g., aplasia of dentition associated with ectodermal dysplasia).
aplasia of dentition,

aplasia

defective development or complete absence of an organ or tissue due to failure of development.

aplasia cutis
see epitheliogenesis imperfecta.
pure red cell aplasia
selective depression of erythropoiesis with anemia resulting.
segmental aplasia
aplasia of a segment of an organ, e.g. uterus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aplasia cutis congenita in a newborn: etiopathogenic review and diagnostic approach.
Abdominal aplasia cutis congenital: case reprt and review of literature.
Autosomal dominant aplasia cutis congenita: report of a large Italian family and no hint for candidate chromosomal regions.
2,3 Furthermore, there is a phenotypic overlap with other well-characterized malformations like Poland syndrome (OMIM 173800), cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita (OMIM 219250), and aplasia cutis congenita (OMIM 107600), which make its diagnosis challenging and may compromise accurate genetic counseling and risk estimation.
A surgery is planned by the plastic surgery department to cover aplasia cutis.
Most commonly, membranous aplasia cutis is an isolated defect and, if there is no palpable component, does not require imaging.
Amongst the less frequent causes, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was seen in 5% cases followed by scleroderma, dermatomyositis, keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (Figure 3), aplasia cutis, kerion, follicular mucinosis, pemphigus, dissecting cellulitis of scalp/ pyogenic folliculitis (Figure 4) and acne keloidalis nuchae in 2.
Key words: Aplasia cutis congenita, familial, sporadic, graft, bleeding.
Infected infants are often pre mature, and typically present with evidence of chronic infection, atrophy, and scars suggestive of epidermolysis bullosa or aplasia cutis congenita.
For example; aplasia cutis, lack of auricular abnormalities, and the presence of neurologic abnormalities usually distinguish Delleman syndrome from the closely related Goldenhar syndrome.
SCALP###The coincidence of sebaceous nevus syndrome, central nervous system malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, and pigmented nevus (giant congenital melanocytic nevus).
In addition, they may have large areas of aplasia cutis and mucosal involvement.