aplasia


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aplasia

 [ah-pla´zhah]
defective development or complete absence of an organ due to failure of development of the embryonic tissues or cells. 2. a hematologic disorder in which the normal progression of cell generation and development does not occur.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·pla·si·a

(ā-plā'zē-ă),
1. Defective development or congenital absence of an organ or tissue.
2. In hematology, incomplete, retarded, or defective development, or cessation of the usual regenerative process.
[G. a- priv. + plasis, a molding]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

aplasia

(ə-plā′zhə)
n.
Defective development resulting in the absence of all or part of an organ or tissue.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

aplasia

Absence of tissue or organ development.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

aplasia

Absence of tissue or organ development. See Pure red cell aplasia, Pure white cell aplasia. Cf Atrophy, Hypoplasia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

a·pla·si·a

(ă-plā'zē-ă)
1. Defective development or congenital absence of an organ or tissue.
2. hematology Incomplete, retarded, or defective development, or cessation of the usual regenerative process.
[G. a- priv. + plasis, a molding]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

aplasia

Failure of the development of an organ or tissue or its congenital absence.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

aplasia

the failure of all or part of a tissue or organ to develop.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

a·pla·si·a

(ă-plā'zē-ă)
Defective development or congenital absence of an organ or tissue.
[G. a- priv. + plasis, a molding]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A clinical diagnosis of aplasia cutis congenita was made.
In these cases CLA is accompanied by hypoplasia or aplasia of the petrous bone.
Human parvovirus B19-induced epidemic acute red cell aplasia in patients with hereditary hemolytic anemia.
In 1973, the Outpatient Clinic of Occupational Diseases of SESI would make an investigation of four cases of bone-marrow aplasia following the death of young workers in the same factory (26).
Severe bone-marrow aplasia following imatinib mesylate in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia.
Incomplete form of Di George syndrome (DGS) which is characterized by hypoparathyroidism, thymic aplasia, facial dysmorphism, and cardiovascular anomalies may present with subclinical endocrine problems and may result in delay in diagnosis.
It is thought to exist along a spectrum of femoral aplasia, the more severe being proximal femoral focal deficiency (PFFD).
Objectives: To evaluate the surgical feasibility and the long-term anatomical and functional results and complication rates in patients with Mullerian aplasia who underwent vaginal reconstruction.