apical cap

ap·i·cal cap

a curved shadow at the apex of one or both hemithoraces on chest x-ray; caused by pleural and pulmonary fibrosis or, on the left, by blood from a traumatic rupture of the aorta.

ap·i·cal cap

(ap'i-kăl kap)
A curved shadow at the apex of one or both hemithoraces on chest x-ray; caused by pleural and pulmonary fibrosis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Apical cap fibrosis is relatively common and was seen in 47% of autopsy cases.
Pulmonary apical cap: a distinctive but poorly recognized lesion in pulmonary surgical pathology.
Braunsophila is the most similar to Xestomyza, but can be separated by the following characters: scape much thicker than pedicel in Xestomyza (same thickness in Braunsophila), pair of finger-like extensions on gonocoxite with strong apical setae and apical cap on aedeagus (both features absent in Braunsophila).
13); aedeagus with ventral apodeme long and forked, dorsal apodeme reduced and apical cap extended and wing-like (Figs 16, 17).
The tissue at the end of the limp is called the apical cap. Sometimes the limb cells will stimulate the cap cells, causing the cap to be larger than would normally be expected.
The nematocyst has a closed apex; an apical cap of electron-dense material is continuous with the thin electron-dense outer wall of the capsule that underlies the nematocyst membrane.
Apical cap showing resemblance to pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification x40).
The free-swimming larvae had three distinct body regions: apical cap, trunk, and caudal region Figs.
The pulmonary apical cap (PAC) has been recognized for more than a hundred years as an anatomically and microscopically distinct form of localized scarring, (1) although its etiology still remains a matter of speculation.
(22) Histologically, apical cap represents a localized area of fibroelastosis that is directly subpleural, extending focally into lung parenchyma.
Apical cap, also referred to as apical scar, is a form of localized pulmonary fibrosis.