apheresis


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apheresis

 [af″ĕ-re´sis]
any procedure in which blood is withdrawn from a donor, a portion (such as plasma, leukocytes, or platelets) is separated and retained, and the remainder is retransfused into the donor. Types include erythrocytapheresis, leukapheresis, lymphocytapheresis, plasmapheresis, and plateletpheresis.. Called also hemapheresis and pheresis.
therapeutic apheresis separation of whole blood into its major components and removal of the abnormal, pathogenic component. Types include plasma exchange (plasmapheresis), removal of white blood cells (leukapheresis), removal of platelets (thrombocytapheresis), and removal of red blood cells erythrocytapheresis). The process is currently used as measure of last resort when conventional therapies are unsuccessful in controlling a chronic, debilitating, or potentially fatal disease. Its primary purpose is to modify the pathologic process so that other treatments can be more effective. It is not a cure. Plasmapheresis may be used in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and some malignancies, in which plasma constituents can interfere with the function of the immune system. Other diseases for which therapeutic apheresis might be used include certain blood dyscrasias such as thrombocytosis, polycythemia vera, and sickle cell anemia.

a·pher·e·sis

(ā-fer-ē'sis), The widely used variant pheresis, which appears even in compound terms such as plateletpheresis, is a corruption of this word.
Infusion of a patient's own blood from which certain cellular or fluid elements (for example, plasma, leukocytes, or platelets) have been removed.
[G. aphairesis, withdrawal]

apheresis

(ə-fĕr′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
1. Linguistics Variant of aphaeresis.
2. apheresis (ăf′ə-rē′sĭs) Medicine A procedure in which blood is drawn from a donor and separated into its components, some of which are retained, such as plasma or platelets, and the remainder returned by transfusion to the donor. Also called hemapheresis.

apheresis

The removal of whole blood from a patient or donor followed by separation into its components, some of which is discarded, with the rest being returned to the patient.

Therapeutic indications 
• Leukocytes in hyperleukemic leukostasis with > 100 x 109/L blasts; 
• Platelets in thrombocytosis with > 1000 x 109/L platelets, if symptomatic; 
• Defective RBCs, replacing them with normal RBCs, as in sickle cell anaemia with crisis; 
• Immunoglobulins causing hyperviscosity syndrome in macroglobulinaemia/myeloma; 
• Autoantibody production in myasthenia gravis, Goodpasture syndrome, SLE, factor VIII antibodies; and 
• Lipoproteins in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia.

a·pher·e·sis

(ăfĕr-ēsis)
Extraction of certain fluid or cellular elements from withdrawn blood, which is then reinfused into the donor or patient; performed therapeutically to remove harmful elements from the blood, and also to obtain immune globulins.
[G. aphairesis, withdrawal]

apheresis

A separating out of a component, usually from the blood. See also PLASMAPHERESIS.

Apheresis

Extraction of a specific component from donated blood, with the remainder returned to the donor.

a·pher·e·sis

, pheresis (ăfĕr-ēsis, fĕr-ēsis)
Infusion of a patient's own blood from which elements (e.g., plasma, leukocytes, or platelets) have been removed.
[G. aphairesis, withdrawal]
References in periodicals archive ?
A retrospective study was conducted to compare data before and after the apheresis nurse scheduling change.
classical whole blood preparation method and platelet apheresis technique.
COLD PRODUCTS: WHOLE BLOOD, APHERESIS PLATELETS AND LIQUID PLASMA
"Apheresis is very effective and has minimal side effects," said Dr Al Zoebie.
Booth is researching the potential of a mobile application to educate patients, nurses, clinical providers and transfusion medicine trainees to raise the awareness and understanding of apheresis medicine.
Axillary vein thrombosis in a healthy donor following platelet apheresis; Br J Hhaematology; 2002;116(2):390-391.
Once every two weeks, a patient spends two to four hours connected to an apheresis unit that removes 70-to-80 percent of the patient's LDL (bad) cholesterol, then returns the blood to the body.
(7) Flynn's main contention is that donors undergoing apheresis should be permitted to receive compensation for hematopoietic stem cell donations in order to incentivize bone marrow donations.
"The decision of whether the donation occurs through aspiration or apheresis should be based on the best clinical judgment of the patient's physician, and will vary from patient to patient," said Boo.
Tokyo, Sept 25, 2009 - (JCN) - Asahi Kasei Kuraray Medical will construct a new plant in Oita, Japan, for the manufacture of therapeutic apheresis devices.