aphasiology


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aphasia

 [ah-fa´zhah]
a type of speech disorder consisting of a defect or loss of the power of expression by speech, writing, or signs, or of comprehension of spoken or written language, due to disease or injury of the brain centers, such as after stroke syndrome on the left side.
Patient Care. Aphasia is a complex phenomenon manifested in numerous ways. The recovery period is often very long, even months or years. Because communication is such a vital part of everyday living, loss of the ability to communicate with words, whether in speaking or writing, can profoundly affect the personality and behavior of a patient. Although aphasic persons usually require extensive treatment by specially trained speech patholigists or therapists, all persons concerned with the care of the patient should practice techniques that will help minimize frustration and improve communication with such patients.
amnestic aphasia anomic aphasia.
anomic aphasia inability to name objects, qualities, or conditions. Called also amnestic or nominal aphasia.
ataxic aphasia expressive aphasia.
auditory aphasia loss of ability to comprehend spoken language. Called also word deafness.
Broca's aphasia motor aphasia.
conduction aphasia aphasia due to a lesion of the pathway between the sensory and motor speech centers.
expressive aphasia motor aphasia.
fluent aphasia that in which speech is well articulated (usually 200 or more words per minute) and grammatically correct but is lacking in content and meaning.
global aphasia total aphasia involving all the functions that go to make up speech and communication.
jargon aphasia that with utterance of meaningless phrases, either neologisms or incoherently arranged known words.
mixed aphasia combined expressive and receptive aphasia.
motor aphasia aphasia in which there is impairment of the ability to speak and write, owing to a lesion in the insula and surrounding operculum including Broca's motor speech area. The patient understands written and spoken words but has difficulty uttering the words. See also receptive aphasia. Called also logaphasia and Broca's, expressive, or nonfluent aphasia.
nominal aphasia anomic aphasia.
nonfluent aphasia motor aphasia.
receptive aphasia inability to understand written, spoken, or tactile speech symbols, due to disease of the auditory and visual word centers, as in word blindness. See also motor aphasia. Called also logamnesia and sensory or Wernicke's aphasia.
sensory aphasia receptive aphasia.
visual aphasia alexia.
Wernicke's aphasia receptive aphasia.

a·pha·si·ol·o·gy

(ă-fā'zē-ol'ŏ-gē),
The science of speech disorders caused by dysfunction of the cerebral language areas.

aphasiology

An obsolete term for:
(1) The formal study of aphasia;
(2) Speech pathology; 
(3) Neurology.

a·pha·si·ol·o·gy

(ă-fā'zē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The science of language disorders caused by dysfunction of the cerebral language areas.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ribbers, "Language lateralisation after melodic intonation therapy: an fMRI study in subacute and chronic aphasia," Aphasiology, pp.
Murray, "Attention and aphasia: theory, research and clinical implications," Aphasiology, vol.
Lambon Ralph, "The effects of decreasing and increasing cue therapy on improving naming speed and accuracy for verbs and nouns in aphasia," Aphasiology, vol.
Ardila, "A proposed reinterpretation and reclassification of aphasic syndromes," Aphasiology, vol.
Paper presented at the Clinical Aphasiology Conference; 2001 Jun; Santa Fe, NM.
Edwards gears this monograph toward various students of aphasiology coming from psychological, linguistic or clinical backgrounds.
Brookshire (Ed.), Clinical Aphasiology: Conference proceedings (pp.
Buxton, "Perfusion imaging and stroke: a more sensitive measure of the brain bases of cognitive deficits," Aphasiology, vol.
Montoro, "Longitudinal patterns of fluency impairment in dementia: the role of domain and 'nuisance variables'," Aphasiology, vol.
Code and Freed present a collection of contributions originally published as a special issue of the journal Aphasiology that examine Aphasia and the rehabilitation of language disorders in adults in general.
Comparative aphasiology takes as a working assumption that the correct level of explanation for a symptom is one that will work across languages of different structures, and it makes a theoretical contribution to neurolinguistics by narrowing down the potential levels of explanation of a symptom.
Brecher, "The Philadelphia naming test: scoring and rationale," Clinical Aphasiology, vol.