aphasic


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Related to aphasic: aphasia, apraxia, dysphasia

aphasic

 [ah-fa´zik]
1. pertaining to or affected with aphasia.
2. a person affected with aphasia.

a·pha·si·ac

, aphasic (ă-fā'zē-ak, ă-fā'sik),
Relating to or suffering from aphasia.

a·pha·si·ac

, aphasic (ă-fā'zē-ak, ă-fā'zik)
Relating to or suffering from aphasia.
Synonym(s): dysphasic.

aphasic

(ă-fā″zik)
1. Pert. to aphasia.
2. Someone affected with aphasia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, many commonly used neuropsychological assessment tests need linguistic processing and/or production demands; thus, there are no unified tests for the cognitive assessment of aphasic patients.
The autonomy of the orthographic pathway in a shallow language: Data from an aphasic patient.
The families of aphasic patients who have physical and communication problems following the cerebral lesion may have psychological problems during the period of adaptation to this new problem they are faced with.
Dan Rothenburg of Philadelphia's Pig Iron Theatre Company describes co-directing Shut Eye with the Open Theater's Joseph Clvaikin, who had become aphasic from a stroke and had difficulty understanding or reproducing basic sentence structure.
In naming treatments for aphasic word-retrieval deficits, however, there is conflicting evidence concerning the degree of generalization to untreated items and contexts [7-10].
His atlas does not review the aphasic syndromes or the functional neuroimaging literature, says Petrides (neurology, McGill U.
In three stanzas of trimeter quatrains, Merrill introduces three examples of deductive recovery in the face of material loss: that of the archaeologist who reconstructs a handmaiden's form from an errant finger in the shattered statuary of an ancient pediment; that of the poet (or reader, or paleographer) who conjures an ode from the remains of a single metrical foot; and that of the steward of a brain-damaged companion, whose patient attention allows him to discern a message in his aphasic friend's torrent of incoherent speech, to infer at last the all-important, misplaced word: (16)
In the Communication and Low Mood (CALM) study, patients in the behavioral therapy group reported better mood, as measured by the 21-item hospital version of the Stroke Aphasic Depression Questionnaire (SADQ) at both 3 and 6 months' follow-up.