aphakia


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aphakia

 [ah-fa´ke-ah]
absence of the lens of an eye, occurring congenitally or as a result of trauma or surgery. adj., adj apha´kic.

a·pha·ki·a

(ă-fā'kē-ă),
Absence of the lens of the eye.
[G. a- priv. + phakos, lentil, anything shaped like a lentil]

aphakia

Lenslessness

a·pha·ki·a

(ă-fā'kē-ă)
Absence of the lens of the eye.
[G. a- priv. + phakos, lentil, anything shaped like a lentil]

aphakia

Absence of the internal crystalline lens of the eye. Aphakia results either from surgical removal or from penetrating injury, which may be followed by absorption. An aphakic eye is severely out of focus and requires a powerful lens for clear vision. Such a lens may be provided as a contact lens, so as to avoid the undue magnification and distortion of glasses. In some cases a lens implant within the eye may be considered feasible.

Aphakia

Absence of the lens of the eye.
Mentioned in: Cataracts

aphakia 

Ocular condition in which the crystalline lens is absent. It may be congenital but usually it is due to surgical removal of a cataract. As a result the eye has no accommodative power and is usually highly hyperopic. See aniseikonia; cataract; pseudophakic eye; aphakic lens; phakic; jack-in-the-box phenomenon; vitreous detachment.
References in periodicals archive ?
(22.) Chen Y, Liu Q, Xue C, Huang Z, Chen Y Three year follow-up of secondary anterior iris fixation of an aphakic intraocular lens to correct aphakia. J Cataract Refract Surg.
Christiansen et al., "Strabismus surgery outcomes in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study (IATS) at age 5 years," Journal of American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, vol.
of eyes Percentage (%) Traumatic Subluxation 9 16.98% Post-surgical aphakia 11 20.75% Dropped nucleus 2 3.77% ACIOL 2 3.77% Congenital subluxation 5 9.43% Senile subluxated cataract 3 5.66% Subluxated IOL 12 22.64% Marfan's 6 11.32% Juvenile cataract with subluxation 3 5.66% TOTAL 53 100% Table 3: Comparing preoperative and post-operative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) BCVA No.
Self, "Is an iris claw IOL a good option for correcting surgically induced aphakia in children?
According to the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study, the number of reported hours of patching throughout the first four years of life is associated with a better visual acuity in cases of unilateral congenital cataracts [25].
Rejdak et al., "Simultaneous correction of post-traumatic aphakia and aniridia with the use of artificial iris and IOL implantation," Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology = Albrecht von Graefes Archiv fur klinische und experimentelle Ophthalmologie, vol.
Cataract, corneal opacity and aphakia were also looked among the elderly.
Chen, "Three-year follow-up of secondary anterior iris fixation of an aphakic intraocular lens to correct aphakia," Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery, vol.
Table 6: Post OP complications- Type of Surgery Complications PE+IOL SICS+IOL ECCE+IOL APHAKIA n=51 n=5 n-=3 (SICS+AV)n=1 Sec Glaucoma 2(4%) -- -- -- Hyphema 2(4%) -- -- -- PS 1(2%) 2(40%) -- -- PCO 15(30%) 3(60%) 1(33%) -- Recurrence 6(12%) 2(40%) -- 1(100%) of Uveitis CME 1(2%) -- -- -- Hypotony 2(4%) -- 1(33%) 1(100%) DISCUSSION: Over the last 2-3 decades, it has been proven that cataract surgery has been of immense benefit in visual rehabilitation of patients with uveitis and cataract.
A potential problem could be that the image size in one eye is so different in size to the other eye (aniseikonia) that binocular fusion is not possible, eg in unilateral aphakia. The best solution for this would be to fit the patient with contact lenses, since the effect of vertex distance is removed, and consequently, spectacle magnification is reduced.
A Comparison of grating visual acuity, strabismus, and reoperation outcomes among children with aphakia and pseudophakia after unilateral cataract surgery during the first six months of life.