apheresis

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apheresis

 [af″ĕ-re´sis]
any procedure in which blood is withdrawn from a donor, a portion (such as plasma, leukocytes, or platelets) is separated and retained, and the remainder is retransfused into the donor. Types include erythrocytapheresis, leukapheresis, lymphocytapheresis, plasmapheresis, and plateletpheresis.. Called also hemapheresis and pheresis.
therapeutic apheresis separation of whole blood into its major components and removal of the abnormal, pathogenic component. Types include plasma exchange (plasmapheresis), removal of white blood cells (leukapheresis), removal of platelets (thrombocytapheresis), and removal of red blood cells erythrocytapheresis). The process is currently used as measure of last resort when conventional therapies are unsuccessful in controlling a chronic, debilitating, or potentially fatal disease. Its primary purpose is to modify the pathologic process so that other treatments can be more effective. It is not a cure. Plasmapheresis may be used in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and some malignancies, in which plasma constituents can interfere with the function of the immune system. Other diseases for which therapeutic apheresis might be used include certain blood dyscrasias such as thrombocytosis, polycythemia vera, and sickle cell anemia.

a·pher·e·sis

(ā-fer-ē'sis), The widely used variant pheresis, which appears even in compound terms such as plateletpheresis, is a corruption of this word.
Infusion of a patient's own blood from which certain cellular or fluid elements (for example, plasma, leukocytes, or platelets) have been removed.
[G. aphairesis, withdrawal]

apheresis

(ə-fĕr′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
1. Linguistics Variant of aphaeresis.
2. apheresis (ăf′ə-rē′sĭs) Medicine A procedure in which blood is drawn from a donor and separated into its components, some of which are retained, such as plasma or platelets, and the remainder returned by transfusion to the donor. Also called hemapheresis.

apheresis

The removal of whole blood from a patient or donor followed by separation into its components, some of which is discarded, with the rest being returned to the patient.

Therapeutic indications 
• Leukocytes in hyperleukemic leukostasis with > 100 x 109/L blasts; 
• Platelets in thrombocytosis with > 1000 x 109/L platelets, if symptomatic; 
• Defective RBCs, replacing them with normal RBCs, as in sickle cell anaemia with crisis; 
• Immunoglobulins causing hyperviscosity syndrome in macroglobulinaemia/myeloma; 
• Autoantibody production in myasthenia gravis, Goodpasture syndrome, SLE, factor VIII antibodies; and 
• Lipoproteins in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia.

a·pher·e·sis

(ăfĕr-ēsis)
Extraction of certain fluid or cellular elements from withdrawn blood, which is then reinfused into the donor or patient; performed therapeutically to remove harmful elements from the blood, and also to obtain immune globulins.
[G. aphairesis, withdrawal]

apheresis

A separating out of a component, usually from the blood. See also PLASMAPHERESIS.

Apheresis

Extraction of a specific component from donated blood, with the remainder returned to the donor.

a·pher·e·sis

, pheresis (ăfĕr-ēsis, fĕr-ēsis)
Infusion of a patient's own blood from which elements (e.g., plasma, leukocytes, or platelets) have been removed.
[G. aphairesis, withdrawal]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, patients with more severe disease may be referred to secondary or tertiary care hospitals which have intensive care and blood centre units which can perform platelet aphaeresis. Hence, superfluous referral of patients to secondary or tertiary care hospitals might be prevented via SGS-based triage.
16: Payne shares the widespread view that Luwian aphaeresis was a common phenomenon.
In present study, the influences of donor's pre-donation platelet count (PC) and haemoglobin concentration (Hb) on the yield of SDP were studied to overcome the problem of scarcity of aphaeresis donors.
Terumo's transfusion division sells mainly low-tech products such as blood bags, blood filters and aphaeresis systems that are used to separate blood components.
All donors must clear recommended physical and health history examinations before donating blood.Aa - Usually only one unit of blood (approximately 0.5 litres, or 1 pint) is given during a donation - The donor's body replenishes the fluid lost from donation within 24 hours.Aa - Two units of red blood cells can be donated at one time, using a process known as red cell aphaeresis. This type of donation can be made every 16 weeks.Aa - Make sure you only donate blood when you are in good health.
Tenders are invited for Purchase of consumables for aphaeresis machine model cobe spectra for the department of transfusion medicine and blood bank at aiims, jodhpur on proprietary basis inviting comments thereon
If this view is adopted, then there probably are no instances of aphaeresis of a- (p.
I therefore believe that a better starting point would be (a)na-ana 'in this way, in that way' with aphaeresis of the first member.
*-[??]wa; 2) aphaeresis of unstressed initial vowels in light stems, e.g., [sti] (C sty) < [asti] (B, M 'sty) "is" [nyu] (C nyw) < [anyu] (B, M 'nyw) "other" (masc.
13: in regard to the variant spelling [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] instead of [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] one should not speak of dropping a consonant (aphaeresis) or in this special case an elision.
(19.) de- (dekk-, dett-) to cover, shut, close, with the typical aphaeresis: DEDR 83 Ta.
But, the aphaeresis of l < l is so rare in South-Arabian onomastics (but normal in North-Arabian) that it cannot be invoked unless as a last resort.