hypertrichosis

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hypertrichosis

 [hi″per-trĭ-ko´sis]
hypertrichosis lanugino´sa persistent or acquired production of lanugo. It may be a congenital, autosomal dominant disorder in which there is excessive hair distributed over the entire body throughout life, usually in association with other congenital anomalies; or it may be acquired, with the degree of hairiness being variable, usually involving the face, and in most cases associated with internal carcinoma.

hy·per·tri·cho·sis

(hī'pĕr-tri-kō'sis),
Growth of hair in excess of the normal.
See also: hirsutism.
Synonym(s): hypertrichiasis
[hyper- + G. trichōsis, being hairy]

hypertrichosis

(hī′pər-trĭ-kō′sĭs)
n.
Growth of hair in excess of the normal.

hypertrichosis

An extremely rare (less 100 cases reported worldwide) excess of hair on the body, which can be generalised or localised, congenital or acquired.

Hypertrichosis
Congenital
• Hypertrichosis lanuginosa, possibly due to an autosomal dominant mutation on 8q;
• Generalised hypertrichosis, due to an autosomal dominant mutation on chromosome x24-q27.1;
• Terminal hypertrichosis, possibly linked to a mutation in MAP2K6 on chromosome 17;
• Circumscribed hypertrichosis;
• Localised hypertrichosis;
• Nevoid hypertrichosis.

Acquired
• Hypertrichosis lanuginosa, linked to cancer, endocrinopathies and therapeutic drugs;
• Generalised hypertrichosis;
• Patterned hypertrichosis;
• Localised hypertrichosis.

hypertrichosis

Hair, hair, much, much. See Congenital generalized hypertrichosis, Hirsutism.

hy·per·tri·cho·sis

(hī'pĕr-tri-kō'sis)
Growth of hair in excess of the normal.
See also: hirsutism
[hyper- + G. trichōsis, being hairy]

hypertrichosis

See HIRSUTISM.

hy·per·tri·cho·sis

(hī'pĕr-tri-kō'sis)
Growth of hair in excess of the normal.
See also: hirsutism
[hyper- + G. trichōsis, being hairy]
References in classic literature ?
To this spot the hungry ape-man made his silent way.
Behind the graceful buck came another which the deer could neither see nor scent, but whose movements were apparent to Tarzan of the Apes because of the elevated position of the ape-man's ambush.
In another instant Numa would be upon them both, so if the ape-man were to dine that night, or ever again, he must act quickly.
Late the next afternoon Tarzan and his Waziri returned with the first load of "belongings," and when the party saw the ancient ingots of virgin gold they swarmed upon the ape-man with a thousand questions; but he was smilingly obdurate to their appeals--he declined to give them the slightest clew as to the source of his immense treasure.
They had carried him but a short distance toward their village when the ape-man's eyelids quivered and raised.
A woman, screaming, ran forward and struck the ape-man across the face.
Could he recall and measure the service the ape-man had performed for him?
From the surrounding village the ape-man heard the bustle of preparation for the feast.
In answer to the cat's growl, a low and equally ferocious growl rumbled upward from the ape-man's deep chest--a growl of warning that told the panther he was trespassing upon the other's lair; but Sheeta was in no mood to be dispossessed.
The panther rose to a sitting position, his bared fangs but a few feet from the ape-man's taunting face.
Like lightning the cat reared and struck a vicious blow at his tormentor with great, bared talons that might well have torn away the ape-man's face had the blow landed; but it did not land--Tarzan was even quicker than Sheeta.
With a roar that mingled with the booming thunder from above he leaped toward the panther, who could only claw futilely with one huge paw while he clung to the branch with the other; but the ape-man did not come within that parabola of destruction.