segregation

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segregation

 [seg″rĕ-ga´shun]
the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn),
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass, for example, those with infectious diseases.
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or oocyte; for example, an individual heterozygous for a gene pair, Aa, will form gametes half containing gene A and half containing gene a.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

/seg·re·ga·tion/ (seg″rĕ-ga´shun)
1. the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.
2. the separation of different elements of a population.
3. the progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the various regions of the forming embryo.

segregation

(sĕg′rĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of segregating or the condition of being segregated.
2. Genetics The separation of paired alleles or homologous chromosomes, especially during meiosis, so that the members of each pair appear in different gametes.

segregation

the separation of paired alleles during meiosis so that members of each pair of alleles appear in different gametes. See also Mendel's laws.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn)
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass (e.g., those with infectious diseases).
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or ovum.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

  1. the separation of HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOMES during anaphase 1 of MEIOSIS, to produce gametes containing only one allele of each gene. Such an occurrence is the physical mechanism underlying the first law of MENDELIAN GENETICS and is particularly important when the two separated alleles are different.
  2. an ability of bacterial REPLICONS to be partitioned accurately and evenly between daughter cells during CELL DIVISION. See par LOCUS.

segregation

the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

adjacent segregation
during meiosis adjacent centromeres segregate together.
alternate segregation
when diagonally opposite centromeres segregate together.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abrahams, in his apartheid setting of the novel, Mine Boy (1963), depicts the suffering of African miners, and the reality of having to confront white subjugation and mistreatment in the mines.
In order to bring the focus back to apartheid, Feld draws on what seems like thin anecdotal sources to prove its centrality in the minds of American Jews--an article in an obscure local Jewish newspaper or a passing mention in a correspondence between communal leaders.
are struggling against Israeli Apartheid - participating in Israeli Apartheid
Hendler, P (1991), "The housing crisis", in Swilling, M, Humphries, R, and K Shubane (eds), Apartheid city in transition: Contemporary South African debates.
An apartheid state does not allow the segregated people citizenship nor equal rights such as voting or freedom of speech.
What would have happened had Mandela died in prison as was the intention and hope of the upholders of apartheid," he said.
She claimed that while many Americans were urging our government to use economic sanctions to pressure South Africa to end apartheid in the 1980s, "Ronald Reagan wanted to solidify, you know, U.
We in Cor Cochion were jailed in Merthyr for collecting for the prisoners of apartheid while singing freedom songs.
IN 1984, 12 brave young workers in recession-hit Dublin launched a strike in solidarity with South Africans during apartheid.
The illness dated back to the 27 years he spent in apartheid jails, including the notorious Robben Island penal colony.
Ruth First and Joe Slovo in the War Against Apartheid
Summary: Cape Town: The foundation chaired by South Africa's last apartheid president FW de Klerk .