segregation

(redirected from apartheid)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to apartheid: Nelson Mandela

segregation

 [seg″rĕ-ga´shun]
the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn),
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass, for example, those with infectious diseases.
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or oocyte; for example, an individual heterozygous for a gene pair, Aa, will form gametes half containing gene A and half containing gene a.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

(sĕg′rĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of segregating or the condition of being segregated.
2. Genetics The separation of paired alleles or homologous chromosomes, especially during meiosis, so that the members of each pair appear in different gametes.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn)
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass (e.g., those with infectious diseases).
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or ovum.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

  1. the separation of HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOMES during anaphase 1 of MEIOSIS, to produce gametes containing only one allele of each gene. Such an occurrence is the physical mechanism underlying the first law of MENDELIAN GENETICS and is particularly important when the two separated alleles are different.
  2. an ability of bacterial REPLICONS to be partitioned accurately and evenly between daughter cells during CELL DIVISION. See par LOCUS.
References in periodicals archive ?
As for FIFA, it (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2002/dec/30/zimbabwe.politics) suspended the membership of the Football Association of South Africa in 1961, followed by a decision, in 1968 by the United Nations General Assembly that called for boycotting all sports bodies in South Africa that practiced apartheid. The pressure continued to mount, uniting international solidarity around clear and achievable objectives.
But 25 years after segregation and white minority rule under apartheid was officially ended through a negotiated settlement, South Africais still grappling with racial tensions that, with the growing use of social media, have become more visible.
We deplore the venue cancellation for the scheduled Israeli Apartheid Week event at the museum in Vienna, Austria.
Such were the vagaries of sporting history in apartheid South Africa.
Apartheid - not only in its South African experience, but in its clear definition under the 1973 International Covenant on the Suppression and Punishment of the Crime of Apartheid - possesses a fundamental characteristic that defines its practice wherever it exists: 'two populations, one of them endowed with all civil rights and the other denied all rights'.
Apartheid - the disgraceful form of government in which whites held all the power and blacks and other racial groups were segregated and oppressed -- was officially ended in 1990 by South African's then president, FW de Klerk.
During the 1970s and 1980s, internal resistance to apartheid became increasingly militant, prompting brutal crackdowns by the National Party administration and protracted sectarian violence that left thousands dead or in detention - including African National Congress (ANC) leader Nelson Mandela - later to become President of South Africa.
On 2nd February 1990, perhaps the most institutionalised version of racism ended: The Apartheid in South Africa.
It is a commonplace that, for all its ideological pretensions, apartheid was about the management of black urbanization in South Africa, through influx control for Africans and residential segregation for coloreds and Indians.
Making Freedom: Apartheid, Squatter Politics, and the Struggle for Home, an adaptation of her PhD dissertation, is a somewhat misleading title since Makhulu extends her discussion of housing politics in South Africa past the era of apartheid up to the present.
The political and social system of institutionalized racial segregation and discrimination known as apartheid originated in South Africa, after the region was colonized by the English and Dutch in the seventeenth century.
Much has been written around the intricate details of apartheid and the lingering effects it has had in the country, particularly for the Black population.