chemodectoma

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chemodectoma

 [ke″mo-dek-to´mah]
any benign, chromaffin-negative tumor of the chemoreceptor system, such as a tumor of the carotid, aortic, or tympanic body.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

che·mo·dec·to·ma

(kē'mō-dek-tō'mă),
Aortic body, carotid body, chemoreceptor, or glomus jugulare tumor; nonchromaffin paraganglioma; receptoma; a relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the carotid body, glomus jugulare, and aortic bodies; consisting histologically of rounded or ovoid hyperchromatic cells that tend to be grouped in an alveoluslike pattern within a scant to moderate amount of fibrous stroma and a few large thin-walled vascular channels. Compare: paraganglioma.
[chemo- + G. dektēs, receiver, fr. dechomai, to receive, + -oma, tumor]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chemodectoma

(1) Paraganglioma. 
(2) Carotid body tumour, see there.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

che·mo·dec·to·ma

(kē'mō-dek-tō'mă)
A relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the carotid body, glomus jugulare, and aortic bodies.
Compare: paraganglioma
Synonym(s): glomus jugulare tumor.
[chemo- + G. dektēs, receiver, fr. dechomai, to receive, + -oma, tumor]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Aortic body tumors are located at the base of the heart within the pericardial sac, and are more frequently observed between the aorta and the pulmonary artery (JOHNSON, 1968).
These represent cases of aortic body tumors diagnosed by histopathology at the Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, during 1993-2006, and are from dogs submitted for routine necropsy after euthanasia or spontaneous death.
Six cases of aortic body tumors were diagnosed in dogs by histopathology during the 13year evaluation period.