tense

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tense

(tens),
Tight, rigid, or strained; characterized by anxiety and psychological strain.
[L. tensus, pp. of tendo, to stretch]

tense

(tĕns)
1. Tight, rigid.
2. Anxious, under mental stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aramaic [square root of (term)]pys derives from Greek[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], the aorist infinitive of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (LSJ 1353-54).
is implied in the aorist, an anticipated payment for the divine pardon.
Nunez-Pertejo 2003:145; Huddleston & Pullum 2006:201), which is also apparent from examples where an aorist participle is co-ordinated with a true adjective (see e.g.
1.123, pos do*sousi "how will they give?," paralleling the future form do-se of PY Un718, lines 3 and 9, and then, in reference to the Achaians' previous distribution of spoils, he uses dosan "they gave" at 1.162, paralleling the equally unaugmented aorist form dahan, which is likely in the Pylos tablet.
Ipfv (msg) Pfv (msg) Fut (1SG) L-form, -aan tilaanu tililu tilum T-form, -aand whaandu whaatu whaam Stem change Ihayaanu laadu lhaayum Imp (SG) Converb L-form, -aan til tili T-form, -aand wha whai Stem change Ihay Ihayi Table 32: TM A categories in SP, Sw and Klk (Ext = Tense extension) Core Ext SP Sw Klk Ipfv Pst - thaan-aloo cunuun-s PfV Prs muru hinu thiloo-noo - Pst samoolu de thil-aaloo cuni-s Aorist Prs - khom-noo ?
The above translation attempts to capture the force of two participles, one present [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.], the other aorist [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.], in the first sentence.
The form of the verb used here (passive aorist) speaks of something that has already happened, not of a promise or hope for the future.
Benveniste has in mind nonsubjective language that he associates with French realist fiction with its use of the "past historic" (aorist) tense.
The fundamental tense is the aorist, which is the tense of the event outside the person of a narrator" (208).
Sowc't' is a splendid aorist of some cant verb; Aubrey's age, via Grose's Dictionary, established the modern British demotic sense ('tart') of baggage; his bouncing Mayd Jillian prognosticates the lascivious Ann Jillian in the TV sitcom It's A Living.