tense

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tense

(tens),
Tight, rigid, or strained; characterized by anxiety and psychological strain.
[L. tensus, pp. of tendo, to stretch]

tense

(tĕns)
1. Tight, rigid.
2. Anxious, under mental stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aramaic [square root of (term)]pys derives from Greek[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], the aorist infinitive of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (LSJ 1353-54).
One of the weaknesses of previous research on the categorial status of the 'adjectival' participle is that it does not take into account either the perfect or the aorist participle (which, as mentioned above, could also be used for adjectival periphrasis).
The Aorist in Croatian is also largely aspectual in nature (Lindstedt 1985), and it signals the immediacy of the conceptualizer to the action (Geld and Stanojevic 2011).
Although 1 Thessalonians 1:4-10 and 2:1-3:5 involve narrative elements (they recall Paul's experiences among the Thessalonians), they do not narrate a sequence; nevertheless, Paul does use the aorist for the main events.
5) Technically a double entendre, kataluo used in the aorist tense has two pertinent nuances, absorbing both meanings at the same time.
Das Tempus, dass am haufigsten mit Renarrativformen wiedergegeben wird, ist der Aorist.
In the additional sentence beginning [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] he marked two stages, the first being in the aorist passive [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
243), and readers who have not struggled to master that distinctive Greek verbal form known as the aorist will miss the sense of Felix Moscheles's attempt to quiz his friend on a point of grammar: 'What is the Aoristus primus of typto [strike or hit], Felix?
Forms of the verb [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (including the aorist [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) are thus used in both the Iliad (e.
While Pavese has made a strong case for the existence of the verb, its presence in Pythian 12 has two problems: the meter requires a problematical dissyllabic form of the aorist stem [GREEK TEXT OMITTED]; and there is a harsh mixture within three lines of the metaphors of "drying up" and "dimming" ([GREEK TEXT OMITTED], 13) the Gorgon.
There are four examples of the aorist middle participle urana--from the verb [?
Good pleasure" sounds like a noun as it is translated, but it is an aorist verb--eudokesen--that means you have already been given God's own realm.