antivivisection


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an·ti·viv·i·sec·tion

(an'tē-viv'i-sek'shŭn),
Opposition to the use of living animals for experimentation. See: vivisection.

antivivisection

adjective Referring to animal rights activism, see there; opposed to the act or practice of performing experiments on living animals.

antivivisection

(ant″i-viv′ĭ-sek″shŏn) [ anti- + vivisection]
Opposition to vivisection or the use of live animals in experimentation.
antivivisectionist (-viv″ĭ-sek′shŏn-ist)
References in periodicals archive ?
The resolution and the French Academy's scornful reproach of English antivivisection, however, far from succeeded in silencing international criticism against French experimental physiology.
The animal plot in Phelps's novel--in particular, the theme of abduction of animals and the painful practices inflicted on them in the name of science--situates it firmly within the body of antivivisection literature that was pervasive and popular reading in the period.
5) Like many of the early feminists who played a central role in the antivivisection movement, Carroll draws a direct connection between the oppression of women, laborers, and animals.
21) Indeed, the majority of the antivivisection activists, animal welfare activists, and vegetarian activists have been women, and throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries their defense of animals rested on appeals to human compassion and sympathy.
The animal rights movement, from deep ecology and antivivisection militancy to its gentler green versions, has placed the legal differentiation between human and animal firmly on the political agenda and has drafted a number of bills of animal entitlements.
By 1878, "at the height of her involvement in the antivivisection campaign," Frances Power Cobbe published the essay "Wife-torture in England," exposing domestic violence (Caine 138).
THE University of Liverpool has been "named and shamed" in an antivivisection campaign.
Estelle Fishbein was absolutely correct to say the antivivisection groups' goal is to wear the researchers down through costly measures.
Procter & Gamble was the recent victim of a global boycott organised by Uncaged Campaigns -- an antivivisection pressure group based in Sheffield.
The committee had two initial objectives: to protect scientific research by heading off national antivivisection laws, and to establish a National Board or Department of Health.
It was the first success in more than a century of antivivisection campaigns in the United States and Europe.
The new welfarists include People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, the American AntiVivisection Society, and others commonly thought to support animal rights (pp.