antitrust law


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Related to antitrust law: contract law, Competition law

antitrust law

Legislation that limits the ability of an enterprise or group of individuals to monopolise a service or product, thereby controlling and restricting free trade.

antitrust law

Government Legislation that limits the ability of organizations or groups of individuals to monopolize a service–or product, thereby controlling and restricting free trade. See Safe harbor rules.
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If enacted, the bill would have reversed Leegin and again made it a violation of the antitrust law per se for a franchisor to enter an agreement with its resellers setting a minimum resale price for the franchisor's product.
The Section also produces three premier periodicals: the Antitrust Law Journal, Antitrust magazine and The Antitrust Source, an online publication.
However the NFLPA no longer has to worry about a scenario where labor law only applies, as the High Court sent the NFL a resounding message that antitrust laws apply to football.
The Antitrust Paradox changed the direction of antitrust law by systematically applying economic analysis to the legal issues that face courts in antitrust litigation.
banking, mobile telecommunications, and digital databases) has generated debate about antitrust law and policy.
But the AT&T case demonstrates that enforcement of antitrust laws can generate as much or more intervention.
When Lockyer initially announced his investigation, some labor attorneys argued that his suspicions about the legality of the pact were unfounded due to broad exemptions in federal labor law that allow for companies bargaining in a bloc - like Albertson's, Vons and Ralphs - to act in ways that would generally be in violation of antitrust laws.
Due to oddities of antitrust law, merger may be allowable under circumstances where partial integrations by contract would be blocked.
The Mack case holds that consumers have standing to sue for price-fixing under DTPA despite their lack of standing to sue under either federal or state antitrust law.
Several days later, the jury awarded the plaintiffs, Blue Cross and Blue Shield United of Wisconsin, approximately $16 million dollars, which, under federal antitrust law, was automatically tripled to approximately $48 million.
John Johnson has been appointed an Assistant Editor of the Antitrust Law Journal by the American Bar Association Section of Antitrust Law for the 2010-2011 ABA year.
Research handbook on the economics of antitrust law.