antithyroid


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antithyroid

 [an″te-thi´roid]
suppressing or inhibiting thyroid activity.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·ti·thy·roid

(an'tē-thī'royd),
Relating to an agent that suppresses thyroid function (for example, propylthiouracil).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

antithyroid

adjective Referring to an effect that counters thyroid activity.
 
noun An agent that counters thyroid activity.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
2011;364:1920-1931.) In the present study, selenium supplementation enhanced the effect of antithyroid drugs in patients with recurrent Graves' disease.
[2.] Haggerty JJ Jr, Evans DL, Golden RN, Pedersen CA, Simon JS, Nemeroff CB.The presence of antithyroid antibodies in patients with affective and nonaffective psychiatric disorders.
This can be a potentially life-threatening medical condition, and immediate treatment with antithyroid medication is necessary to lower thyroid hormone levels.
Of 67 patients with GD, 85.1% had been treated with thionamide antithyroid drugs, mostly with methimazole, others 9.0% underwent replacement therapy, and 5.9% underwent thyroidectomy.
Conversely, some cardiovascular complications have been confirmed to persist in overt hyperthyroid patients in spite of active antithyroid treatment [3,10].
We examined the effects of 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (methimazole) and 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU), which are agents that inhibit all peroxidases and are widely used as antithyroid agents targeting thyroid peroxidase.
Antithyroid antibodies and parity: further evidence for microchimerism in autoimmune thyroid disease.
Among deficient subjects, antithyroid peroxidase levels were significantly higher than levels measured in the sufficient group.
However, the main focus is to describe the use of antithyroid medications in the treatment of hyperthyroidism and nursing considerations in the care of patients taking these medications.
New European guidelines call for erythrocyte sedimentation rate/C-reactive protein and blood differential testing for chronic spontaneous urticaria, but others--like liver function tests, hepatitis B, antinuclear antibody, stool, urinalysis, thyroid function, and antithyroid antibodies --should be directed by the history.
Definitive therapy may include antithyroid medication, radioactive iodine ablation (RIA), and/or thyroidectomy.
Effects of l-thyroxine administration, TSH-receptor antibodies and smoking on the risk of recurrence in Graves' hyperthyroidism treated with antithyroid drugs: a double-blind prospective randomized study.