antitermination


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an·ti·ter·min·a·tion

(an'tē-ter-min-ā'shŭn),
A process of bacterial RNA polymerase wherein it is resistant to pause, arrest, or termination signals. It is an important control mechanism in the reproduction of some bacteriophages.
See also: hesitant, overdrive.

an·ti·ter·min·a·tion

(an'tē-tĕr-mi-nā'shŭn)
A state of bacterial RNA polymerase wherein it is resistant to pause, arrest, or termination signals.
See also: hesitant, overdrive

antitermination

a process in which RNA POLYMERASE does not recognize a normal TRANSCRIPTION termination signal at the end of a GENE or OPERON during transcription and so transcribes the DNA beyond the terminator. Antitermination provides a means of regulating the EXPRESSION of genes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The life of phages is discussed in contributions on DNA packaging in double-stranded DNA phages, general aspects of lysogeny, gene regulatory circuitry of phage lambda, regulation of lambda gene expression by transcription termination and antitermination, and phage lysis.
In teaching a course in feminist health psychology to postgraduate nurses, the first author (Potgieter) found that many of those who were antitermination at the beginning of the course changed their attitudes when they were exposed to alternative arguments.