antisocial

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antisocial

 [an″te-, an″ti-so´shal]
1. denoting behavior that violates the rights of others, societal mores, or the law.
2. denoting the specific personality traits seen in antisocial personality disorder.
antisocial personality disorder a personality disorder characterized by a conspicuous disregard for the rights and needs of others. Antisocial behavior begins before the age of 15 and includes such behaviors as truancy, delinquency, theft, and vandalism. Adults with this disorder show a lack of maturity, unwillingness to take responsibility, and emotional instability. The chief characteristic of such persons is an apparent lack of conscience. Their behavior includes a variety of antisocial and criminal acts, such as theft, engaging in an illegal occupation (for example, selling drugs), repeated defaulting on debts, sexual promiscuity, and repeated lying. In addition, an antisocial personality is often impulsive and aggressive and is unable to maintain consistent, responsible functioning at work, at school, or as a parent. Substance abuse is common.

As in other personality disorders, individuals with antisocial personality disorders refuse to admit to any problems. A patient who is a criminal may honestly believe that anyone who is not a criminal is merely stupid. Those with antisocial personalities often seem to be unable to learn from experience. They also are seldom willing to accept psychiatric help and when they do agree to consult a mental health professional, it is often only to avoid the legal consequences of their activity.

an·ti·so·cial

(an'tē-sō'shŭl),
Manifesting at least some of the traits of an antisocial personality disorder; disregard for social or legal norms, lying, aggressiveness, indifference to others' rights or safety, irresponsibility, blaming others, and showing minimal or no remorse. See: antisocial personality, antisocial personality disorder. Compare: asocial.

antisocial

(ăn′tē-sō′shəl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
1. Shunning the society of others; not sociable.
2. Hostile to or disruptive of the established social order; marked by or engaging in behavior that violates accepted mores: gangs engaging in vandalism and other antisocial behavior.

an′ti·so′cial·ly adv.

an·ti·so·cial

(an'tē-sō'shăl)
Opposed to the rights of people or to the legal norms of society.
Compare: asocial
References in periodicals archive ?
how far they would agree that they use the platform antisocially, to 'show off', 'be mean', or 'to badmouth people' for example, or prosocially -'to keep in touch with people' or 'to show support for others' ).
The tendency to behave antisocially could be an outlet for restricted freedom of choice and individuality imposed by psychologically controlling parents (Aquilino, 2006; Arnett, 2004).
28 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that eight month-old infants support negative behavior if it is directed at those who act antisocially -- and dislike those who are nice to bad guys.
The police have strong powers to seize bikes that are being ridden antisocially. If anyone has any information about who is riding bikes in this manner, please contact your local policing team on 01484-436855.
behave antisocially as an adolescent or young adult.
Thus, these people act antisocially because they are not known as
He added: "At present they are prevented from dealing with their pupils if they run wild in a shopping mall or behave antisocially in town centres.
When you mislead listeners about probability, you can interfere with their decision making and antisocially influence their planning and behavior.
(19) After claiming ignorance of the "hardcore scene," lead singer Breedlove presents a series of short, declamatory statements describing her own antisocially coded activities that serve to establish her own genuine "punkness." The thick guitar texture shifts from providing a continuous mass of sound to alternating with the voice to allow the first of these statements, "I was queer," to be heard clearly.
She was banned from behaving antisocially throughout Manchester.
characteristics that are undersirable to people with whom one wishes to have social or business dealings." (37) In other words, blackmail would seem to serve the public good by imposing an expectation of future expense on those who act antisocially or unprofessionally.
"Anybody that is suspected of violent behaviour will be kept away from the game, and anybody who does behave antisocially will be dealt with by South Wales Police who have a fantastic track record."