antisocial


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antisocial

 [an″te-, an″ti-so´shal]
1. denoting behavior that violates the rights of others, societal mores, or the law.
2. denoting the specific personality traits seen in antisocial personality disorder.
antisocial personality disorder a personality disorder characterized by a conspicuous disregard for the rights and needs of others. Antisocial behavior begins before the age of 15 and includes such behaviors as truancy, delinquency, theft, and vandalism. Adults with this disorder show a lack of maturity, unwillingness to take responsibility, and emotional instability. The chief characteristic of such persons is an apparent lack of conscience. Their behavior includes a variety of antisocial and criminal acts, such as theft, engaging in an illegal occupation (for example, selling drugs), repeated defaulting on debts, sexual promiscuity, and repeated lying. In addition, an antisocial personality is often impulsive and aggressive and is unable to maintain consistent, responsible functioning at work, at school, or as a parent. Substance abuse is common.

As in other personality disorders, individuals with antisocial personality disorders refuse to admit to any problems. A patient who is a criminal may honestly believe that anyone who is not a criminal is merely stupid. Those with antisocial personalities often seem to be unable to learn from experience. They also are seldom willing to accept psychiatric help and when they do agree to consult a mental health professional, it is often only to avoid the legal consequences of their activity.

an·ti·so·cial

(an'tē-sō'shŭl),
Manifesting at least some of the traits of an antisocial personality disorder; disregard for social or legal norms, lying, aggressiveness, indifference to others' rights or safety, irresponsibility, blaming others, and showing minimal or no remorse. See: antisocial personality, antisocial personality disorder. Compare: asocial.

antisocial

(ăn′tē-sō′shəl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
1. Shunning the society of others; not sociable.
2. Hostile to or disruptive of the established social order; marked by or engaging in behavior that violates accepted mores: gangs engaging in vandalism and other antisocial behavior.

an′ti·so′cial·ly adv.

an·ti·so·cial

(an'tē-sō'shăl)
Opposed to the rights of people or to the legal norms of society.
Compare: asocial
References in periodicals archive ?
Coun Nigel Murphy, deputy leader of Manchester council, said: "This flat was a magnet for the worst kinds of antisocial behaviour.
Community council members were told that, without residents reporting incidents of antisocial behaviour, Police Scotland were unable to allocate the necessary resources to Dunblane.
Inspector Vicky Stables, from the community policing team, said: "While the vast majority of people coming to Aberdeen city centre do so peacefully, where individuals choose to engage in antisocial behaviour which results in distress to members of the public, we will take action.
We will not tolerate antisocial behaviour and will take swift action to deal with any issues.
"In the past year, we have seen a significant decrease of 21 per cent compared to last year regarding incidents of antisocial behaviour.
A spokesperson for MPS Shortlands said: "Please note there is a antisocial behaviour dispersal zone in place in the beckenham area due to youths on bicycles this dispersal zone runs untill 5pm on the 12th may 2019 and youths can have bicycles seized during this time if they continue to behave in a antisocial manner."
The majority of studies which have been carried out in accordance with these criteria have been considered very restrictive and of little use in the explanation of the etiology of antisocial behaviour.
Research indicates that early traumatic experiences have been associated with different type of personality disorders, including antisocial PD, histrionic PD, borderline PD and narcissistic PD.4
"We are confident that these dispersal zones will enable us to robustly tackle antisocial behaviour and general disorder in key areas of the city, allowing us to move on people who are causing a nuisance."
She added: "We will be proactive in tackling head on those whom we have identified as likely to cause, or get involved in, antisocial behaviour.
Symptoms for depression and antisocial behavior were evaluated using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, a self-reported survey, and a self-reported questionnaire on recent antisocial behaviors including theft, property damage, and selling drugs.