antiself

antiself

(ant?i-self') [ anti- + self (2)]
The abnormal reaction of antibodies or lymphocytes with antigens present in the host. See: autoantibody; autoimmune disease
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Galectin-10 is also expressed in [CD4.sup.+] [CD25.sup.+] regulatory T-cells [82]; these T-cells are important in downregulation of antiself responses.
pivoting on the glory of the antiself as colonially contrived ...", taking the form of a resplendent Colombian Army battalion for one Indian, while a white colonist encountered a shape-shifting tiger-devil in the person of his shamanic psychopomp (Shamanism 327).
She begins to feel that Rosheen and Dizzy signify these two versions of her personality: Dizzy is her pragmatic antiself (sl), the forthright individual who favours actions over words, while Rosheen represents that romantic tendency to hide in the comforting gauze of language.
"The play," Taylor explains, "is a kind of cubist portrait of Yeats's philosophical system, its various themes and images seen as individual cross-sectional views, planes and surfaces simultaneously presented." He points out the "mock heroic treatment of the subject matter" and notes how inversions and ironies add "unexpected levels of comic improbability and contrast" to carry an audience along so that, "The total effect is one of antic and earthly irreverence, the aesthetic antiself or mask of the serious philosophy embodied in the play" (153).
"Enthusiasm: The Antiself of Enlightenment." Klein and La Vopa 7-28.
Pocock's "Enthusiasm: The Antiself of Enlightenment" appeared first in The Certainty of Doubt: Tributes to Peter Munz, edited by Miles Fairburn and W.
By representing this revision with a spatial metaphor ("the bounding from air to air") he returns to the conceit of a (Dickinsonian) journey, yet it is not the "you" (whether self or antiself) that does this journeying but the moment itself.
But that escape, too, is doomed, since Philip encounters the antiself only through Pipik's words, which are, of course, ultimately Roth's -- and Philip's -- own.
(Bruce Springsteen is a genius of the Bildungsroman.) One of its central themes is that in order to become himself, the hero must learn not only to face but somehow to internalize his antiself. Both Babel's self and his antiself turn on an axis of violence.
Once externalized, the self is viewed not as the poet's content but rather as a form to be entered into; it is the mask or antiself that must be pursued throughout life.
In this sense, Abbott is the antiself of Gordon: whereas she enforces a strict separation between the life and the literature, he argues that the literature is the life, if we learn how to read it correctly.