antisaccade

antisaccade

A saccade that is directed toward a stimulus.

antisaccade 

A voluntary eye movement made in the direction opposite to the side where a stimulus is presented. The subject is asked to fixate a small dot for some time. A stimulus is then presented to one side and the subject is asked to inhibit a reflex eye movement towards it but to make a saccade in the opposite direction. Analysis of the errors and/or latencies of the antisaccades indicate dysfunction in the frontal lobe, which controls the saccadic eye movements. See saccadic eye movement.
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Executive deficits detected in mild Alzheimer's disease using the antisaccade task.
Munoz & Stefan Everling, Look Away: The AntiSaccade Task and the Voluntary Control of Eye Movement, 5 NATURE REV.
After the 10-minute period, participants' brainpower was rated using eye-tracking equipment that measured reaction times to an eye movement task (the antisaccade task: completion of a nonstandard task).
Comparing the activation in a stop signal, Go/NoGo, and antisaccade paradigm, pre-SMA and different regions of IFC are activated, but still they are related to an activation of rIFG [2].
In addition to this, PD may impair response inhibition, an integral element of impulsivity, with PD patients performing worse on a range of measures of inhibition, including the Stop-Signal Task [4, 5], Go/No-Go [6], and antisaccade [7].
For example, SEM abnormalities have been encountered in Multiple System Atrophy, such as slower prosaccade and increased antisaccade errors [57].
Attention orienting and inhibitory control across the different mood states in bipolar disorder: an emotional antisaccade task.
Antisaccade performance is impaired in medically and psychiatrically healthy biological relatives of schizophrenia patients.
Compensatory effects on the functional level of the SC mediated by the substantia nigra pars reticulata have been reported [59] yielding improved saccade initiation and inhibitory control but did not significantly prevent prosaccades during antisaccade condition [60].
It was found that proactive interference affected low-span participants more than high-span (Kane & Engle, 2000), high-span participants were less vulnerable than low-span to salient distractors in a dichotic listening task (Conway, Cowan, & Bunting, 2001), high-span identified antisaccade targets faster than low-span in a antisaccade task (Kane, Bleckley, Conway, & Engle, 2001) and high-span were faster or less error prone than low-span in a Stroop task (Kane & Engle, 2003; Long & Prat, 2002).