antiretroviral

(redirected from antiretrovirals)
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antiretroviral

 [an″te-, an″ti-ret´ro-vi″ral]
1. effective against retroviruses.
2. an agent with this quality.

antiretroviral

(ăn′tē-rĕt′rō-vī′rəl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Destroying or inhibiting the replication of retroviruses.
n.
An antiretroviral drug.

antiretroviral

Virology adjective Referring to an agent or effect that counters a retrovirus noun A drug that counters or acts against a retrovirus, usually understood to be HIV; FDA-approved antiretrovirals include reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nucleoside analogues and protease inhibitors See Antiretroviral, Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
These differences between black and Hispanic men versus whites remained significant when the researchers limited the analysis of 1231 men taking antiretrovirals for at least 6 months.
The scientists found that, compared to antiretrovirals alone, the addition of the immunotoxin significantly reduced both the number of HIV-infected cells producing the virus in multiple organs and the level of HIV in the blood.
A record number of people with HIV/AIDS now have access to antiretroviral therapy, with 8 million people in low- and middle-income countries on the treatment in 2011, according to a recent report.
Starting antiretroviral therapy reduces the risk of tuberculosis for HIV-positive adults in developing countries by 65%, according to the results of a meta-analysis published in PLoS Medicine.
1, 2009, by, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recommend starting antiretrovirals for HIV in patients with CD4 counts of 350-500 cells/m[m.sup.3], patients with CD4 counts less than 350 cells/m[m.sup.3], pregnant patients, and those with a history of an AIDS-defining illness, hepatitis B, or HIV-associated nephropathy.
Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to a dramatic decline in morbidity and mortality among HIV infected persons both in developed and developing countries.
This is a very important potential drug, but it must be used in combination with other active antiretrovirals. It is usually a mistake to try a new antiretroviral when no others are working, because of the risk of developing resistance to the new drug as well; if possible, patients should wait until more new drugs are available for use in combination.
We describe a severely immunosuppressed HIV-1-positive man in whom immune restoration disease associated with pulmonary infection caused by Mycobacterium microti developed after antiretroviral treatment.
First-trimester antiretrovirals also are indicated in patients who need them immediately for their own health.
Fortunately, the weight of the evidence is that transmission does not occur in the first trimester, so antiretroviral therapy may not be crucial during that time.
* Entry inhibitors gain attention as a potential new class of antiretrovirals.
Two of the world's pharmaceutical giants--Bristol-Myers Squibb and Gilead Sciences--have teamed up to create the so-called holy grail of treatment: a single pill containing an entire day's worth of antiretroviral medications.