antiretroviral


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Related to antiretroviral: Antiretroviral drugs

antiretroviral

 [an″te-, an″ti-ret´ro-vi″ral]
1. effective against retroviruses.
2. an agent with this quality.

antiretroviral

(ăn′tē-rĕt′rō-vī′rəl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Destroying or inhibiting the replication of retroviruses.
n.
An antiretroviral drug.

antiretroviral

Virology adjective Referring to an agent or effect that counters a retrovirus noun A drug that counters or acts against a retrovirus, usually understood to be HIV; FDA-approved antiretrovirals include reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nucleoside analogues and protease inhibitors See Antiretroviral, Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
A subgroup of men who had sex with men in the past 6 months completed a computer-assisted interview about antiretroviral pill-taking and sex behavior.
It was ensured that all the patients were on the same regimen of antiretroviral therapy.
The total cost of home-based testing and initiation of antiretroviral treatment was US$20,005, or US$172 per participant who initiated home care.
The new WHO guidelines also recommend providing antiretroviral therapy to all children younger than 5, all pregnant and breastfeeding women with HIV, and all HIV-positive patients with partners who are not infected, regardless of a person's T-cell count.
The baby remained on the prescribed antiretroviral treatment regimen until 18 months of age, in January 2012.
Studies were eligible for inclusion if they compared the incidence of TB in HIV-positive adults according to their use of antiretroviral therapy.
Patients received different antiretroviral regimens between 1988 and 2009.
The changing natural history of HIV disease before and after the introduction of generic antiretroviral therapy in southern India.
Following the convention of UNAIDS and the World Health Organization (WHO), antiretroviral coverage is calculated as the number of individuals receiving antiretroviral treatment, divided by the sum of the number of untreated individuals needing treatment and the number of treated individuals.
The optimal time to start antiretroviral therapy remains one of the major unanswered questions in the current treatment era.
Most efforts for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV have concentrated on providing antiretroviral therapy around the time of delivery and during the immediate postpartum period to protect the infant.
Researchers used a meta-analysis to review 12 research trials comparing NNRTI to Pl, the two classes of antiretroviral drugs used in highly active antiretroviral therapy.