antiresorptive

antiresorptive

(ant?i-re-sorp'tiv, -zorp') [ anti- + L. resorbere, to suck in]
1. Blocking or opposing the destruction of bone by osteoclasts.
2. An agent that prevents or slows the progress of osteoporosis. See: osteoporosis
References in periodicals archive ?
Recommendations from the Endocrine Society in March 2019, a 2017 position statement from the European Calcified Tissue Society, and guidelines from other groups advise giving antiresorptive treatment (bisphosphonates, hormone therapy, or selective estrogen-receptor modulators) but do not say which one, in what dose, when, or for how long
While effective, teriparatide is significantly more expensive than antiresorptive osteoporosis drugs, partially because there hasn't been competition, the review authors noted--until now.
Although there is actually no study showing that such a strategy would prevent the risk of vertebral fractures, several authors and medical societies advocate, at denosumab discontinuation, for a period of treatment with a bisphosphonate or another antiresorptive agent (estrogens or SERMs) to preserve BMD gain and avoid the risk of vertebral fracture [7, 11, 12].
We used a similar array of implants in both groups, although more adjuvants tended to be given to patients receiving antiresorptive therapy.
Finally, genetic evidence from mice with osteoclast-specific AR deletion indicates that androgen signaling in osteoclasts plays no role in the antiresorptive effect of androgens on the cancellous or cortical bone compartments [17].
and Taisho Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., announced today that Chugai filed a new drug application to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for the oral formulation of bisphosphonate antiresorptive agent which was co-developed by the two companies for the indication of osteoporosis.
A position paper on Medication Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (MRONJ), released by the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, expands the scope of the condition previously referred to as Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (BRONJ) and changes its name to reflect the antiresorptive (denosumab) and antiangiogenic therapies that have recently been associated with the condition.
It is also the most widely prescribed antiresorptive for treatment of osteoporosis globally and has been clinically studied for over 18 years.
In recent years there has been increased interest in the effects of antiresorptive therapies on trabecular architecture.
The prescription drugs approved for the treatment of fracture prevention are often classified by whether they reduce bone loss (antiresorptive) or promote bone growth (Table 1).