antirejection


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antirejection

(ăn′tē-rĭ-jĕk′shən, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Preventing rejection of a transplanted tissue or organ.
References in periodicals archive ?
More than 90 percent of the transplants into immunized mice succeeded, even without antirejection drugs.
Survival rates of liver transplant patients have dramatically improved in the last 15 years with better antirejection drugs and supportive care.
Acute Rejection was defined as either biopsy-proven rejection or antirejection treatment without biopsy.
Immunosuppressive therapy was defined as the receipt of corticosteroid treatment (10 mg/day or an equivalent dosage) for >2 weeks of antineoplastic chemotherapy or antirejection medication within 30 days before admission.
Secretary Heather and plasterer Gary are now learning how to give Lydia her medication, such as the antirejection drugs she must take for life.
WASHINGTON -- The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, more effective prophylactic regimens, and improvements in surgical technique and antirejection therapy have made solid organ transplantation a possibility for HIV-infected patients, said Marla J.
The treatment was developed at the University of Pittsburgh (PA) using the hypothesis that delivering antirejection therapy directly into the lungs might provide greater protection for transplant recipients.
Other conventional medications are used to help modulate the immune response, such as gold injections, antirejection drugs, and even the antimalarial drug Plaquenil.
Studies of renal transplant patients have shown that the most frequent stressors were the cost of health care, weight gain, long-term side effects of antirejection medicines, worry that changes in appearance would effect social life, limitations of physical activity, fear of repeated hospitalizations, risk of infections, fear of transplant rejection, and uncertainty about the future (Fallon, Gould, & Wainwright, 1997; Frey, 1990; Sutton & Murphy, 1989; White, Ketefian, Starr, & Voepel-Lewis,
Results from controlled clinical trials with renal transplant patients have shown that the addition of MMF to immunosuppression protocols with cyclosporine and steroids substantially reduces the early acute rejection rate and decreases the need for antirejection therapy while showing a favorable safety profile (6-8).
To mimic potential use in humans, the researchers now plan to give the proteins to monkeys that have already taken standard antirejection drugs, Knechtle says.
According to her Manchester physician at the time of the operation, however, Laura had a "better that) 50-50 chance." After all, the three previous child recipients of multiple organs at Pittsburgh since the advent of a new antirejection drug in 1992 are still alive.