antipyretic bath

antipyretic bath

a bath in which tepid water is used to reduce body temperature.

an·ti·py·ret·ic bath

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik bath)
Sponging or soaking to reduce fever.
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]
References in classic literature ?
He wishes her to go into a convent, but she won't hear of it, and after a touching appeal, is about to faint when Roderigo dashes in and demands her hand.
Be- cause the reporter was rapidly becoming a man something of his man's appeal, combined with the winsomeness of the boy, stirred the heart of the lonely woman.
They were all I had for an answer to the new appeal.
with an appeal to Miss Mayblunt--"composed by my father in honor of Sister Janet's wedding.
Receiving no reply to this extraordinary appeal, which in truth, as it was delivered with the vigor of full and sonorous tones, merited some sort of notice, he who had thus sung forth the language of the holy book turned to the silent figure to whom he had unwittingly addressed himself, and found a new and more powerful subject of admiration in the object that encountered his gaze.
Young men who, drunk or sober, spent the firm's money on women who disappeared before sunrise did not appeal to him.
Still, her native kindliness was brought strongly into play, not by what was darkly picturesque in his situation, nor so much, even, by the finer graces of his character, as by the simple appeal of a heart so forlorn as his to one so full of genuine sympathy as hers.
I have not known the man to whose innate kindliness I would more confidently make an appeal.
He was foremost at all races and cock fights; and, with the ascendancy which bodily strength always acquires in rustic life, was the umpire in all disputes, setting his hat on one side, and giving his decisions with an air and tone that admitted of no gainsay or appeal.
It was to me in particular that he appeared to propound this-- appeared almost to appeal for aid not to hesitate.
I should like to conclude the chapter with the above appeal, but cannot, owing to my anxiety to repel a charge often made against whalemen, and which, in the estimation of some already biased minds, might be considered as indirectly substantiated by what has been said of the Frenchman's two whales.
All of these things were printed in many languages, as were also the names of the resorts, which were infinite in their variety and appeal.