antipyretic


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antipyretic

 [an″te-, an″ti-pi-ret´ik]
1. effective against fever; called also antifebrile.
2. something having this effect, such as a cold pack, aspirin, or quinine; antipyretic drugs dilate the blood vessels near the surface of the skin, thereby allowing more blood to flow through the skin, where it can be cooled by the air. An antipyretic can also increase perspiration, the evaporation of which cools the body. Called also febricide and febrifuge.

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik),
1. Reducing fever. Synonym(s): antifebrile, febrifugal
2. An agent that reduces fever (for example, acetaminophen, aspirin). Synonym(s): febrifuge
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]

antipyretic

/an·ti·py·ret·ic/ (-pi-ret´ik)
1. relieving or reducing fever.
2. an agent that so acts.

antipyretic

(ăn′tē-pī-rĕt′ĭk, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Reducing or tending to reduce fever.
n.
A medication that reduces fever.

an′ti·py·re′sis (-rē′sĭs) n.

antipyretic

[-pīret′ik]
Etymology: Gk, anti + pyretos, fever
1 pertaining to a substance or procedure that reduces fever. antipyresis, n.
2 an antipyretic agent. Such drugs usually lower the thermodetection set point of the hypothalamic heat regulatory center, with resulting vasodilation and diaphoresis. Widely used antipyretic agents are acetaminophen, aspirin, and NSAIDs. Also called antefebrile, antifebrile, antithermic.

antipyretic

Antifebrile adjective Referring to an antifebrile agent or effect noun An agent that relieves or reduces fever

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik)
1. Reducing fever.
Synonym(s): antifebrile.
2. An agent that reduces fever (e.g., aspirin).
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]

antipyretic

A drug or other measure which lowers a raised body temperature.

Antipyretic

A drug that lowers fever, like aspirin or acetaminophen.
Mentioned in: Fever

antipyretic

an agent that reduces body temperature, e.g. aspirin

antipyretic,

adj/n a drug that reduces fever. Also known as
febrifuge.

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik)
1. Reducing fever.
Synonym(s): antifebrile, febrifugal.
2. An agent that reduces fever (e.g., acetaminophen, aspirin).
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]

antipyretic (an´tīpīret´ik),

n a drug that reduces fever primarily through action on the hypothalamus, thereby resulting in increased heat dissipation through augmented peripheral blood flow and sweating.

antipyretic

1. effective against fever.
2. an agent that relieves fever. Cold packs, aspirin and quinine are all antipyretics. Antipyretic drugs dilate the blood vessels near the surface of the skin, thereby allowing more blood to flow through the skin with increased heat loss by radiation and convection. Also, an antipyretic can increase perspiration, the evaporation of which cools the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Al-Ghamdi [16] evaluated antipyretic activity of aqueous extract of N.
The antipyretic activity was evaluated using albino mice (25-30 g) of either sex (Khan et al.
Dose of antipyretic medication in children should be accurately based on body weight and should not merely be estimated (Tables 5 - 7).
Similar antipyretic evaluation procedure was adopted for the crude saponin using three dose levels: 200, 400 and 600 mg/kg of crude saponin; and for the Va-SB also, using 200, 300 and 400 mg/kg of the chromatographic fraction, Va-SB as test doses.
Despite this, there are some important points to note about the use of antipyretic drugs because although they are commonly used they can themselves cause problems, even if given at the right dose.
Objective: This study was conducted to introduce mothers' knowledge and practices on fever, measuring fever and using antipyretics.
In 130 patients (65%), some traditional methods were performed in addition to antipyretic to lower the body temperature.
Antipyretic or analgesic drug use within 8 hours was reported by 1,121 (39.
Though this may not be consistent with the practices employed in the acute care setting, health care professionals in acute care are better equipped to assess, monitor, and treat adverse outcomes of an alternating antipyretic regimen in a manner not possible in the home.
Ibuprofen is a better antipyretic than acetaminophen
In a similar way a screening exercise was carried out to determine the antipyretic potential of the extract using yeast induced pyrexia method in rats.
In a sample of more than 200,000 children from 31 countries, those given the antipyretic for fever in their first year of life were about 50% more likely to have experienced asthma symptoms at age 6-7 years than were unexposed children.