antiprogestin

antiprogestin

 [an″te-, an″ti-pro-jes´tin]
a substance that inhibits the formation of progestational agents; the most common example is mifepristone.

an·ti·pro·ges·tin

(an'tē-prō-jes'tin),
A substance that inhibits progesterone formation, that interferes with its carriage or stability in the blood, or that reduces its uptake by, or effects on, target organs (for example, RU486, mifepristone).

antiprogestin

/anti·pro·ges·tin/ (an″te-) (an″ti-pro-jes´tin) a substance that inhibits the formation, transport, or action of progestational agents.

antiprogestin

[-prōjes′tin]
a substance that interferes with the production, uptake, or effects of progesterone. The most common example is mifepristone.

an·ti·pro·ges·tin

(an'tē-prō-jes'tin)
A substance that inhibits progesterone formation, interferes with its carriage or stability in the blood, or reduces its uptake by, or effects on, target organs (e.g., RU-486, mifepristone).
Synonym(s): progesterone antagonist.
References in periodicals archive ?
The drugs used were mainly mifepristone (RU 486), a potent antiprogestin in combination with prostaglandin [E.
In vitro assessment of putative antiprogestin activities of phytochemicals and synthetic UV absorbers in human endometrial Ishikawa cells.
The reverse of the anti-fertility effects of prolonged, low-dose antiprogestin management supports the clinical practicability of effective antiprogestins as potential contraceptives for women27.
Various studies demonstrated the cure of pyometra with only a single use of 10 mg/kg of antiprogestin aglepristone subcutaneously on days 1, 2 and 8 of the diestrus, combined with cloprostenol, which induces the opening of the cervix and the resulting drainage of the uterus (13-15).
There are three types of ECPs: combined ECPs containing both estrogen and progestin, progestin-only ECPs, and ECPs containing an antiprogestin (either mifepristone or ulipristal acetate).
Mifepristone is an antiprogestin licensed for pregnancy termination in more than 40 countries around the world.
Exposure of BT-474 cells to MPA in vitro also resulted in lower levels of RANKL; an effect that was independent of progesterone receptors since it occurred both in the presence and absence of the antiprogestin RU-486.
Regulation of bcl-2 gene family members in human endometrium by antiprogestin administration in vivo.
In 1998, the first-generation antiprogestin mifepristone was approved for use in France in medical abortion.
Given the results obtained with a mild antiprogestin like gestrinone, it was logical to expect even better results with the first "real antiprogestin", mifepristone (48), widely known as the "abortion pill".
Studies carried out using onapristone, an antiprogestin, formed the basis of WHO trials on the potential of mifepristone as a weekly pill and research pursued on injectables was the premise on which it is being planned to be introduced into the National Family Welfare Programme.