antiplatelet

(redirected from antiplatelet drugs)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to antiplatelet drugs: anticoagulant drugs

an·ti·plate·let

(an'tē-plāt'let),
A substance that manifests a lytic or agglutinative action on blood platelets, thereby inhibiting or destroying the effects of the latter.

antiplatelet

(ăn′tē-plāt′lĭt, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Acting against or destroying blood platelets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients suffering from TIAs or ischemic stroke for [greater than or equal to]6 months, taking antiplatelet drugs and presenting consecutively to the Neurology clinic of CMH Lahore were included in this study.
For example, if one is taking an herbal containing gingko biloba, used to improve memory or brain health, it may interact with so-called blood thinners like aspirin, and other antiplatelet drugs or anticoagulants which patients with heart, brain and blood-vessel problems usually take.
Background: Antiplatelet drugs are effective in preventing recurrence of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetic patients.However, the efficacy and usefulness of 2 different antiplatelet drugs, aspirin and cilostazol, in the progression of carotidintima-media thickening are unknown.
Aspirin helps prevent platelets in the bloodstream from clumping together and forming a clot, so it is called an antiplatelet drug; other antiplatelet drugs include Clopidogrel (Plavix) and ticagrelor (Brilinta).
Current antiplatelet drugs prevent the clotting cells in the blood called platelets from sticking together, which helps people who have heart disease.
This included 28,583 who were not taking any antithrombotic treatment, 12,751 who were taking subtherapeutic doses of warfarin (international normalized ratio (INR) of less than 2 at the time of their stroke), and 37,674 who were taking only antiplatelet drugs when additional treatment was indicated, the investigators said (JAMA.
Background and Objective: Antiplatelet drugs are frequently used after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery to prevent venous graft occlusion.
In contrast to the use of blood pressure and lipid lowering drugs and anticoagulants, where biomarkers (blood pressure, blood lipids, and coagulation screen) can be used to adjust treatment, antiplatelet drugs are given in a "fire and forget" manner since there are no validated, widely available, or inexpensive tests of platelet function that measure platelet activity reliably and reproducibly, correlate with recurrent events, and can be measured remotely from a dedicated platelet laboratory.
The aim of this study was to examine the transient events of concurrent use of antiplatelet drugs with a set of prespecified CMs and its association with hospitalization due to major bleeding events.
Twenty-two patients were on antiplatelet drugs and/or oral anticoagulants: 11 aspirin alone, 2 clopidogrel alone, 3 aspirin and clopidogrel, 4 vitamin K antagonists (VKA), and 2 VKA and antiplatelet.
Others are likely to be discovered, and some of these non-hemostatic platelet functions can be attenuated with antiplatelet drugs, expanding the applications of these drugs to non-traditional uses.