antipathy


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Related to antipathy: Antipathic, antipathetic

an·ti·pa·thy

(an-tip'ă-thē)
Aversion, repugnance, intolerance.
[G. antipatheia]

antipathy

(an-tip′ă-thē) [ anti- + -pathy]
1. A feeling of strong aversion.
2. An object of strong aversion.
antipathic (ant″i-path′ik), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
We do not anthropomorphize nature or blame it when we recognize this consequence; yet, it deserves our special antipathy.
"The antipathy towards being on the bench is strong," Riihilahti wrote this week.
The evil record of past sovereigns has left a basic antipathy to Government on a hereditary basis.
I HAVE received a document from Merseytravel in which their conclusion is that: "The eagerness of two local MPs, the local business community, motoring organisations and a number of tunnel users to see tolls reduced, and their antipathy to use toll income to subsidise public transport is understandable.
Most importantly, Gager illuminates the bases of the Church's stated antipathy to adoption, resolving the apparent contradiction between the Church's acceptance of spiritual, invented ties of god parenthood and its suspicion of actual adoption.
There's also a religious component to some of the antipathy, one example of which are the Winanses, who made a publicity splash with their song "Not Natural." Among the forums the sisters have won for themselves have been two appearances on the Black Entertainment Television cable network.
Born of technophobia, cultural inertia, and an antipathy to the market, this familiar narrative of doom may be soothing to an increasingly hard-pressed group.
"To talk about Microsoft and public antipathy is to lay bare our longstanding national ambivalence about intelligence," the author writes at one point.
Politically, the "second reformation" failed because this popular antipathy to religious change was shared by the class which dominated Brandenburg politically and economically, the landed nobility.
Suzanne Delehanty has described the "Technological Reliquaries" as "a protest against pop arts ready acceptance of mass production and minimalism's idealization of technology." One would agree that they subvert those dominant modes of the '60s, whether humorously or in outright antipathy. In 1981, Richard Flood argued that the putrefied flesh in Thek's boxes was symptomatic of the disaffection caused by the Vietnam War, in the Rotterdam catalogue, he writes of them even more provocatively, acknowledging the ahistoricism of his claim, as metaphors for a world beset by AIDS, which killed Thek in 1988.
Nonetheless, despite institutional child care's historical and continuing domination by religious institutions whose operation the government would certainly not subsidize in other areas, the fear of godless, communal, socialistic secular humanism (which has supplanted the fear of Catholic conspiracies) remains, I suspect, a potent factor in right-wing antipathy to institutional child care.
Not by the antipathy towards Robert Mugabe's Zimbabwe regime in this country's right wing publications but by why they were not similarly moved by government-sponsored atrocities in, say, Rwanda, or Eritrea.