antinomy


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an·tin·o·my

(an-tin'ō-mē), Do not confuse this word with antimony.
A contradiction between two principles, each of which is considered true.
[anti- + G. nomos, law]

antinomy

A contradiction between two rules or laws, each of which is considered true.

True contradictions are not known to exist in science, only disparate explanations for poorly-understood phenomena in the biophysical universe.

an·tin·o·my

(an-tinŏ-mē) Do not confuse this word with antimony.
A contradiction between two principles, each of which is considered true.
[anti- + G. nomos, law]
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References in periodicals archive ?
This antinomy, which appears to be a special case of the first antinomy in the concept of law, thus concerns the question of the relation between the concept of law and the concept of the sources of law.
This is why he tries to bring the lack into view through a travesty of logical form which subverts the structure of logic by articulating an antinomy which is at once within and without the phallic order.
(Is this his own constitutive antinomy?) And is it true that a writer discards her position and identity in order to write?
But Yeats's dualistic "insistence on the antinomy" is at odds with the monism of the Upanishads.
Most of the chapter concerns two central but obscure features of Kant's discussion of property: the Postulate of Practical Reason with Regard to Right and the antinomy of Right.
What if the contradiction between unifying sympathy and divisive criticism was not a fruitful tension but an unresolvable antinomy of the public sphere, one that reflects problems with how the theory and the institution wishes to erase the contestation that constitutes it?
The other view questions the genuineness of this critique on the preference for modem knowledge and contends that emphasizing the difference between scientific knowledge on the one hand and traditional knowledge on the other is just another "self-privileging antinomy" (as there are many in anthropological theoretical discourse).
This examination of equal protection jurisprudence reveals ten antinomies and shows that current law favors the conservative preference within each antinomy. Part II posits that co-constitutive theory offers a framework for understanding how both the antinomic debates and their attendant choices become internalized and naturalized throughout law and society.
Its numerous flaws range from harmless typos to omitted apostrophes and prepositions to serious misspellings of terms and proper names: antinomy appears as antimony (xi, 85); the theologian John of Damascus retains his French name, but unorthographically as Jean Damescene instead of Damascene (63); the Italian visionary Giordano Bruno becomes Giodano (66); and most surprisingly, the priestess Diotima of Plato's Symposium is not only mistranslated but also transgendered to Diotimus (10).
There is no overall account of his philosophy, and he is glimpsed only through the frame of the modern/postmodern antinomy. There can be no objection to this in principle.
There is no crude supply side/demand side antinomy. Americans like drugs, and the state sees this as an opportunity.