antinomy

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an·tin·o·my

(an-tin'ō-mē), Do not confuse this word with antimony.
A contradiction between two principles, each of which is considered true.
[anti- + G. nomos, law]

antinomy

A contradiction between two rules or laws, each of which is considered true.

True contradictions are not known to exist in science, only disparate explanations for poorly-understood phenomena in the biophysical universe.

an·tin·o·my

(an-tinŏ-mē) Do not confuse this word with antimony.
A contradiction between two principles, each of which is considered true.
[anti- + G. nomos, law]
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References in periodicals archive ?
philosopher's application of the antinomic principle to linguistic
It is obviously not the only possible conception, although in certain circumstances which "liberate" the antinomic element of the unconscious itself, it is perhaps irresistible.
Like de Bouhelier, D'Annunzio thus calls for a new social role for the artist, whose task will be precisely that of recomposing in an organic whole the scattered fragments of nineteenth-century culture, and in particular those terms which appear to be in antinomic relation: science and art, analysis and synthesis, sentiment and thought (cf.
* The pact, constantly renegotiated and changing, that replaces the non applied and rigid law (itself antinomic to the concept of caring communities).
It is antinomic to speak about emergence and about control on the emergence.
Put simply, co-constitutive theory suggests that the antinomic alternatives are not mutually exclusive, contradictory, or even dichotomous.
The stimulus here derives from a Nietzschean tradition that preceded the rise of high modernism and from writers influenced by it, such as de Certeau, for whom historiography--as quoted by Rabasa--'bears within its own name the paradox--almost an oxymoron--of a relation established between two antinomic terms, between the real and discourse' (IA, p.
Human thinking and feeling are thus antinomic by nature.
(83) "In this way, the solution is that one conceives of this antinomic propositions ...
In Drop City, this antinomic relationship assumes dramatic force when the hippies must struggle to move their possessions to Alaska.
Bourdieu's use of habitus has to be seen in the context of his broader project, 'whose ambition is not simply to combine, articulate or join structure and agency but, more fundamentally, to dissolve the very distinction between these two seemingly antinomic viewpoints of social analysis' (Wacquant 1993: 3).
When is this discourse best understood as self-contradictory, and when does it occupy that fraught, perhaps necessarily antinomic space where a certain limit to comprehension has been recognized and reflected upon but cannot be grasped or transcended?