antimetabolite

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antimetabolite

 [an″te-, an″ti-mĕ-tab´o-līt]
1. a substance bearing a close structural resemblance to one required for normal physiological functioning, and exerting its effect by interfering with the utilization of the essential metabolite.
2. a class of antineoplastic agents consisting of antimetabolites of substances required for cell growth and replication; the interference with cell function is phase specific, largely in the S phase of the cell cycle. The group includes cladribine, cytarabine, floxuridine, fludarabine, fluorouracil, mercaptopurine, methotrexate, and thioguanine. See also antineoplastic therapy.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·ti·me·tab·o·lite

(an'tē-me-tab'ō-līt),
A substance that competes with, replaces, or antagonizes a particular metabolite; for example, ethionine is an antimetabolite of methionine.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

antimetabolite

(ăn′tē-mĭ-tăb′ə-līt′, ăn′tī-)
n.
A substance that closely resembles an essential metabolite and therefore inhibits physiological reactions involving that metabolite.

an′ti·met′a·bol′ic (-mĕt′ə-bŏl′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

antimetabolite

Antimetabolic agent Pharmacology Any agent–eg, MTX, 6-mercaptopurine, thioguanine, 5-FU, gemcitabine that is a structural analogue of a native cell metabolite, which either inhibits the enzymes of a particular metabolic pathway or is incorporated during synthesis to produce defective product or prevents replication; anti-metabolites are used as chemotherapeutics, antivirals and as immunosuppressants, and include analogues of purines–eg azathioprine, pyrimidines, folic acid–eg aminopterin, MTX See Azathioprine, Methotrexate.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

an·ti·me·tab·o·lite

(an'tē-mĕ-tab'ō-līt)
A substance that competes with, replaces, or antagonizes a particular metabolite; e.g., ethionine is an antimetabolite of methionine.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

antimetabolite

An anticancer, or CYTOTOXIC, drug which acts by combining with essential enzymes within cancer cells so as to interfere with their metabolism and growth. To be useful, antimetabolites must be significantly more toxic to cancer cells than to normal cells.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Antimetabolite

A drug that interferes with a cell's growth or ability to multiply.
Mentioned in: Chemotherapy
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The arrows in the following diagram chart the reader's experience of processing the four-term ABBA pattern of an antimetabolic trope-
The course of the arrows with the return to the original A term visually represents the antimetabolic rhetorical effect of containment, of the enclosure or knotting of the values or ideas making up the trope.
Time and again in King John, antimetabolic language obfuscates and thus throws into doubt what has been made clear, a dramatic fact in the play graphically illustrated during Constance's flyting with Queen Eleanor in act II.
King Philip's portrayal of Constance's complaint as a series of "ill-tuned repetitions" (II.i.197) includes a negative judgment upon her antimetabolic speech.
This antimetabolic double-speak focuses the depressing no-win situation in which Philip stands, a king who for valid political reasons wants to ally himself with England through the proposed dynastic marriage of his son Louis and John's niece Blanche but finds himself blocked by the powerful Pandulph.
In rats fed with experimental diet T2 containing raw SB seeds, a part of the protein supplied might be rerouted for the synthesis of digestive enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin to offset the effects of various antimetabolic substances present in the raw SB seeds.
DPD is also the principal enzyme involved in detoxification of pyrimidine-based antimetabolic analogs, such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a drug that is commonly used in the treatment of solid tumors (colon, breast, head, neck, ovary, and skin).
[5.] Perumal S, Klaus B and PSM Harinder Chemical composition, protein fractionation, essential amino acid potential and antimetabolic constituents of an unconventional legume, Gila bean (Entada phaseoloides Merrill) seed kernel.