antilipemics

an·ti·li·pe·mics

(an'tē-li-pē'miks)
Drugs used to reduce lipid levels in blood in patients with a history of coronary heart disease or diabetes mellitus. Proven effectiveness in reducing incidence of nonfatal myocardial infarction and coronary death.
[anti- + lipemia + -ic]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Taken in sum, all of the antilipemics, with the exception of niacin, have the potential to cause a deficiency of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) in mother's milk and in the nursing infant.
Antilipemic agents are a pharmacologic class that contains 18 drugs.
The only immunoglobulin in the antilipemic class is evolocumab (Repatha), which has no human pregnancy data.
Advertising for antilipemic drugs was positively associated with prescriptions for both antilipemics in general (41 prescriptions for every $1000 of advertising; P=.003) and Zocor in particular (23/$1000; P<.001).
In addition to pharmacological agents such as ACE inhibitors, hormone replacement therapy drugs, many of the drugs used in diabetes treatment, statin class antilipemics, pathophysiological factors like hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, smoking, insulin resistance, affect fibrinolytic activity in a positive or negative way (14, 21).